Monthly Archives: August 2011

The Hollywood Reporter’s Best 25 Film School Rankings


For those interested in film school possibilities, here is the Hollywood Reporter‘s ranking of what it consideres to be the top 25 film schools in the world. As with any ranking, it must be taken with a grain of salt (most of the schools listed are in the United States [and the majority in the state of California], with only one in Asia, and four in Europe), but of particular interest to Nigerian filmmakers may be the less expensive non-American schools on this list.

To read the entire ranking which The Hollywood Reporter states is its “inaugural list (comprised with help from industry insiders) of the world’s best” with details on each school, click through to the Hollywood Reporter article. I’ve listed the schools from the article here with links to each university.

1. American Film Institute (Los Angeles, California, USA)

2. University of Southern California (Los Angeles, California, USA)

3. Beijing Film Academy (Beijing, China)

4. New York University Tisch School of the Arts (Manhattan, New York, USA)

5. University of Southern California Los Angeles (UCLA) (Los Angeles, California, USA)

6. California Institute of the Arts (Valencia, California, USA)

7. The Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (Prague, Czech Republic)

8. Columbia University School of the Arts (Manhattan, New York, USA)

9. Wesleyan University (Middleton, Connecticut, USA)

10. The National Film and Television School (Beaconsfield, United Kingdom)

11. La Femis (Paris, France)

12. University of North Carolina School of the Arts (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA)

13. University of Texas at Austin (Austin, Texas, USA)

14. The Polish National Film, Television, and Theatre School (Lodz, Poland)

15. Syracuse University (Syracuse, New York, USA)

16. Stanford University (Palo Alto, California, USA)

17. Florida State University College of Motion Picture Arts (Tallahassee, Florida, USA)

18. Emerson Visual and Media Arts School (Boston, Massachusetts, USA)

19. Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles, California, USA)

20. University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA)

21. Rhode Island School of Design (Providence, Rhode Island, USA)

22. Chapman University, Dodge College of Film and Media Arts (Orange, California, USA)

23. Ringling College of Art and Design (Sarasota, Florida, USA)

24. Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois, USA)

25. Colorado Film School (Denver, Colorado, USA)

 

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A few updates to the website for the Hausa Home Video Resource Centre


For regular visitors to this site, just a few updates to the website that might be useful:

1) I have added a new page for upcoming events/deadlines, which you can access by clicking the link here, or at the top of the page under the hausahomevideoresourcecentre title, or under the Pages title at the top right hand corner of the blog. Since I post so many opportunities for professional development for filmmakers (whether training, award opportunities, film festivals submissions, etc), for scholars (conferences, journals, and calls for papers) and events (film festivals and events with Hausa artists), I thought it would be good to have a central calender where all these opportunities were listed by date.

2) I have created a Facebook page for the site, for those of you who like to recieve updates on Facebook. To “like” and recieve updates on facebook, click the “like” button at the top righthand corner of the page. For those who don’t use facebook but who would like to follow the blog, there is also an email subscribe box under the facebook box.

Enjoy!

Homevida 2011 Script competition: Nigeria’s Integrity Film Awards, Submission Deadline: 31 August 2011 (EXTENDED to 9 September for short script competition)


UPDATE: 26 August 2011: Deadline now extended to 9 September. for the short film script competition

Homevida, an “initiative of the Public and Private Development Center (PPDC), a Nigerian Citizenship sector organization that seeks to assist and empower ordinary citizens to participate in governance and development” calls for nominations “for its feature film Awards and entries for the short film script competition in the following prize categories”:

The Family Friendly film prize (endowed by the National Film and Video Censors Board)

The winning film must be:

a) A film suitable for children or family viewing and

b) That captures the heritage, diversity and challenges of Nigeria and Nigerians OR

c) Depicts the moral values common to Nigeria

d) Have a storyline that is believable, realistic, dramatic and entertaining

The Due Process Film prize (endowed by the Bureau for Public Procurement)

The winning film must be a film:

a) A story encouraging integrity, true competition, transparency, accountability, especially amongst contractors and government officers OR

a) Showing interactions between stakeholders in the procurement process OR

b) Depicting due process as a standard for human conductOR

c) Comparing those who remain with the old practices of bribery, influence peddling, forgery, contract abandonment and use of fake materials and a new breed of contractors who are professional and competitive

d) Reasonably modeling the new procurement framework; its dos and don’ts.

The Faith Film Prize* (endowed in honour of Late Pastor Don Igwe)

 The winning film must be:1.A film that models individual citizens involvement in promoting the virtues of honesty, transparency, integrity and accountability as an expression of the Christian faith OR2.A film depicting individuals sense of duty to society and one another as a way of serving God3. The story must be believable, realistic, dramatic and entertaining.

The Public Conduct Film Prize (endowed by Code of Conduct Bureau)

The winning film must

a) Depict life in Public service in Nigeria and

b) Models what is right and wrong in conflict of interest situations and ethical implications of gift, OR

c) A film that portrays the consequences of choices that public servants make OR

d) Show (positive) effects of integrity reforms

e) Have a storyline that is believable, realistic, dramatic and entertaining.

To be eligible for entry all films must:

1. Have been produced in Nigeria

2. Be a drama film

3. Be between 60mins and 120mins

4. Technically be of broadcast standards with clear sound and vision

5. Be realistic, dramatic and entertaining

6. Produce documentation to show clearance of music rights, script and talent

7. Show evidence of registration with NFVCB (if the film has been released)

8. Be made by filmmakers who are 18 years and above

9. Have its Producer, Director and Screenwriter registered with the relevant industry guild or association.

10. Meet individual criteria for the prize being applied for

To nominate a film:

1. Complete an application form online

2. Include a synopsis of your nominated film in no more than 300 words

3. Send biographies of key production personnel (if known)

For more information, see the Homevida website or the Homevida Facebook site.

*When Carmen McCain, coordinator of the Hausa Home Video Resource Centre requested for more information on the awards, Homevida clarified that the scripts submitted must be in English and that the “faith film prize”, which is “endowed in honour of Late Pastor Don Igwe” is only for Christian faith films. The representative of the National Film and Video Censor’s Board at the Nollywood conference  in Lagos where the call for scripts was announced clarified that they would welcome endowments and sponsorships for prizes from other faith traditions….

Call for papers on Contemporary Youth Cultures in Africa for special issue of African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society. Abstract deadline: 30 September 2011


Call for papers for special issue of African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society

Call for Papers (African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society): Late Modernity, Locality and Agency: Contemporary Youth Cultures in Africa

More than a decade and half ago, Donal Cruise-O’Brien (1996) had declared that the African youth were ‘a lost generation.’ This fatalistic summation of the fate of the African youth was perhaps for good reason. The enormous socio-economic and cultural forces surrounding the lives of young people in Africa were [and still are] simply daunting. And at the very core of this seemingly insurmountable socio-economic atmosphere are the pervasive unjust protocols of postcolonial regimes under which most African youth live. Indeed, more recent scholarship suggests that there is no respite yet for the African youth as the hopeless situation has escalated (See Abbink, Jon and Ineke Van Kessel 2005 & Alcinda Honwana and Filip De Boeck 2005). On account of the inclement socio-economic and political circumstances surrounding young people in Africa, what we are now witnessing across the entire continent is what Mamodou Douf (2003) describes as the ‘dramatic irruption of young people in both the domestic and public spheres,’ putting young people at the very heart of the continent’s socio-economic and political imagination (Durham 2006).

But the challenges facing African youth are not peculiar to them. All over the world, the new sociology of youth points to a growing concern about the ramifications of globalization, late modernity and general global social and economic restructuring for the lives and futures of young people. But amidst the lingering fears of the future of the young, scholars have also called for a deep reflection and rethinking of young people’s own resilience and agency in the midst of these turbulent times. This special issue of African Identities, tentatively entitled Late Modernity and Agency: Youth Cultures in Africa, seeks to reflect on the varied contours of youth responses to social change in Sub-Saharan Africa. While young people in Africa continue to face extraordinary social challenges in their everyday lives, what are the unique ways in which they have reinvented their circumstances to keep afloat in the midst of seismic global social changes? Papers are solicited on a wide range of topics on the African youth that may unravel young people not only as victims but also as active social actors in the face of a shifting global modernity. The themes may include amongst others:

– African Youth and Globalization
– Late Modernity and Social Change
– Youth and Media—Film, Television, Video, Internet, etc
– Hip-hop, Club Cultures and other forms of Popular culture
– Mobility and Social Media
– Gender and New Economies of Youth
– Democracy, Power and Youth Activism
– Youth and Conflict in Africa
– New Subjectivities and Agency
– Neo-Pentecostalism as Subculture
– The Informal Economy and Invented Pathways
– Lifestyles and Identity Constructions
– New Spatial Politics in Public and Domestic Spaces

Abstracts of not more than 500 words (including name, position, institutional affiliation, and email contact) may be sent to
P.UGor@bham.ac.uk no later than September 30th, 2011. This special issue of African Identities will be published in the summer of 2012.

Call for abstracts for journal Many Cinemas: Dread, Ghost, Specter, and Possession in Asian, African, and Latin American Cinema. Deadline 15 August 2011


See this call for abstracts for the journal  Many Cinemas:

Dread, Ghost, Specter, and Possession in Asian, African and Latin American Cinema

“For who can wonder that man should feel a vague belief in tales of disembodied spirits wandering through those places which they once dearly affected, when he himself, scarcely less separated from his old world than they, is for ever lingering upon past emotions and bygone times, and hovering, the ghost of his former self, about the places and people that warmed his heart of old?”
(Charles Dickens: Master Humphrey’s Clock)

In our third issue of manycinemas we are turning our attention to the unexplainable and the supernatural. We are looking for academic essays on films in which we get in touch with “Dread, Ghost, Specter, and Possession.”

We are interested in cinematic aesthetics of films which show these phenomena out of the view of different cultural backgrounds. Like in the other issues these should be films from Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Dread – cinema is a modern tale. The monsters of childhood/past come alive and haunt the protagonists on the screen. How do they meet their fears? How does the film show the fear? And, is there any escape?

Ghost – what kind of ghosts are manifested in non-western cinema? How do they haunt, or do they do such things at all?

Specter – dreams, visions, how does film show these things, from where do they come from, and what kind of meaning they have?

Possession – how is a character going to be possessed by something/someone. And how is the behavior of the possessed?

There are many movies all over the world which show one of these phenomena. We are looking for essays which analyze films on one, two, or more of the issue’s topics.

We are interested in:

– the cultural anchors and meaning(s) of supernatural phenomena
– appearance of ghosts, specters, etc.
– the role of ghosts/ specters in movies (good or evil)
– dread and religion
– raising the dead
– juju films, yokai movies, etc.
– and much more

We are also looking for our rubric “Beyond the Screen” for an essay on this topic which is loosely connected to film like theater, music, dance, performance, visual culture, comic…

Please send us your proposal (300-500 words) with the titles of films you will include and a brief CV until 15th August 2011. (later complete essays until 15th March 2012). Do not hesitate to mail us, if you have some questions.

The later articles should have a length of 3000 to 5000 words. For styleguide: look here http://www.manycinemas.org/styleguide.html

Please

send your proposal to
Helen Staufer and Michael Christopher
manycinemas@anpa.de
or: editors@manycinemas.org

Conference: Women in Literature and Films in Northern Nigeria. Abstract Deadline: 10 October 2011


Conference to be held at Kwara State University, Malete, Kwara State, 29 November to 2 December 2011

UPDATE (22 September 2011): The abstract deadline has been extended. One page abstracts are invited from interested participants on any aspect of the conference theme and sub-themes, to reach the organizers immediately but not later than October 10th, 2011, the extended submission deadline.

THEME: WOMEN IN LITERATURE AND FILMS IN NORTHERN NIGERIA

In continuation of the Literature in Northern Nigeria Conference tradition started in 1989 by Bayero University Kano, it has been resolved that henceforth future conferences will be jointly organized by Bayero University, Kano and Kwara State University, Malete, and the venue shall be rotated between the two universities. This year’s edition being the 6th will be hosted by the Kwara State University, Malete. The collaboration is intended to:

a)      Enhance the position of the conference as a major intellectual and scholarly destination in Nigeria
b)      Aim at helping to achieve intellectual excellence through the high level academic standard of discourse.

This year’s theme shall be on the issue of women, gender, and sexuality and will form the basis of the academic scholarship for this year’s conference. Women as creative writers and as characters in northern Nigeria and their constraints as individuals within a religious and socially conservative society will also be examined in relation to the representations of women issues in the literature and films of contemporary Northern Nigeria. Critical evaluation is expected to be made of the choice of genres, and how writers have applied individual imaginative and instructive emphasis to the treatment of such chosen and selected creative genre by the women creative writers. Furthermore, the role of religion in gender groupings, in the identification of themes and the understanding of characterization in the creative works, will be subjects of discourse by interested scholars. “kannywood” (Kano) movie industry which is predominantly of Hausa content, context, and of northern Nigerian thematic preoccupation inline with the portrayal of women will also be examined. The presentation of women as symbols of the stories and characters or as ‘caricatures’ in the films within northern sociological norms will also be examined.  Other themes in the works of the women writers, traditional singers and performers, themes in the works in which women are portrayed such assaranrhya, ‘victimhood in popular culture’, love themes and violence within domestic situations, women in rural communities, politics and women, rural women and global perspectives, women as ethnic, religious and cultural stereotypes and their acceptability by both the reading and viewing audience, will also be discussed.

Subthemes are:

  • Women images in popular culture
  • Psychology of gendered behaviours in literary works
  • Language in northern Nigerian women literature
  • Northern Nigerian women literature and political awareness
  • Women writers and images of women
  • The works of Zaynab Alkali
  • Islam, women, literature and films in Northern Nigeria
  • Portrayal of women in northern Nigerian Literature
  • Imaging of women in northern Nigerian films
  • Kannywood and representation of gender issues.
  • Women as sexual symbols in northern Nigerian literature
  • Women singers and performers
  • Women film makers and actresses.
  • Women, dance and music in northern Nigeria dramatic performance
  • Women themes in traditional oral performances
  • Women and religion in northern Nigerian films or literature
  • The influence of Western Education on northern Nigerian literature

Scholars who will speak at the conference include:

Professor Abiola Irele, Provost, College of Humanities, Management and Social sciences, Kwara State UniversityProfessor Abiola Irele, Provost, College of Humanities, Management and Social sciences, Kwara State University. He is a renowned critic from Harvard University with strong view on women and literature.


Professor Zainab Alkali, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Nasarawa State University Professor Zainab Alkali, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Nasarawa State University. A powerful female writer and activist on the position of women in Northern Nigeria. Her works form a sub-theme of the conference.


 Professor Mary Kolawole, HOD, Language and Literary Studies, KWASUProfessor Mary Kolawole, HOD, Language and Literary Studies, KWASU. A strong believer and teacher of gender studies.


Dr. Halimat Sikula Dr. Halimat Sikula, She is on sabatical at Kwara State University where she teaches literature of the 20th century, a young, vibrant, radical novelist and poet whose up and coming voice would be a major addition to the discuss of the conference

The abstract deadline listed on the website was 30 June 2011, but to request further information, contact information is listed here. To book a hotel reservation for the conference, click on this link.

Amaka Igwe Holds National Auditions for First Film Since 2004


(press release recieved)

Amaka Igwe Holds National Auditions for First Film Since 2004

Respected filmmaker Amaka Igwe is set to hold auditions across the nation, starting with Lagos on Friday  5th of August, 2011.

Over the years, auditions held by Amaka Igwe have led to many breakthrough careers in Nollywood and beyond. The famous creator of Nigerian television classics such as Checkmate and Fuji House of Commotion, and director of some of Nollywood’s most respected films such as Rattlesnake, Violated and Forever says holding these auditions is in line with her tradition of discovering new talents.

“We have always held auditions every one or two years. We haven’t held one in a while and we have decided to hold one now, especially as we are gearing up for new productions and completion of some that we started last year.”

According to the Chief Operating Officer of Amaka Igwe Studios, Chris Ihidero, those who have auditioned at AIS at any point in the past and have filled the Artiste Form are not expected to attend these auditions as the studio already has their profile and pictures.

“We are looking for fresh talents, hoping to give opportunities to a new set of actors. Those we have auditioned in the past we already know about. We are holding these auditions around the country because we have new projects, including films a major film to be directed by Amaka Igwe in September 2011. This will be her first film since 2004, although she has continued to work on television dramas and comedies. This film will be a blockbuster so we are looking for the best fresh talents Nigeria can offer.”

Actors are expected to come and pick up free audition forms from Monday 1st August, 2011, attach two  5’7 pictures (Bust and Full body) and submit before the day of the audition.

The dates of the auditions in other parts of the country will be announced soon.

The Lagos auditions will hold from 10am at Amaka Igwe Studios, 44A Palm Avenue, MKO Abiola Gardens, Alausa Ikeja.

For more information, please call Tomi on  08023525104.