Category Archives: Academic

Call for Papers: Evolving African Film Cultures: Local and Global Experiences at the University of Westminster, London: Abstract Deadline 8 June 2012


CALL FOR PAPERS
 
Evolving African Film Cultures: Local and Global Experiences
 
Conference organised by the
Africa Media Centre, University of Westminster
 
Date: Saturday 10 and Sunday 11 November 2012
Venue: University of Westminster, Regent Campus
309 Regent Street, London, W1B 2UW
 
This is the first call for papers for a two-day conference on changes in African film and television production and, of equal importance, the transformation of African film audiences in local and global contexts. African film production, distribution and consumption have been more noticeable in the West African region, as showcased by biennial exhibitions at the FESPACO festivals in Burkina Faso. Arguably, such festivals have encouraged a type of production that is admired by Europeans, but which is rarely available to, or appreciated widely by audiences in those productions’ countries of origin. Portuguese and Arab-speaking regions in Africa have also developed diverse and high quality film cultures, but their experiences need to be debated within a wider context. More recently, Anglophone regions, led by Nigeria, have developed popular commercial film models which have been enthusiastically received by African audiences. One could say that African film markets have been rapidly expanding, with many implications for film and policy makers, distributors and audiences. 
 
Since 2000, audiences for African film elsewhere in the world have grown in size. Such expansion has implications for film content, form, production strategies, distribution mechanisms and policy frameworks. African filmmakers have to delicately negotiate widening markets, for instance, by paying  more attention to the political economy of film consumption in the rapidly changing local and global contexts. The digital economy, especially the internet, has opened up huge opportunities for the wider distribution of African film. Papers may focus on, among other topics, the following:
 
•             Production cultures and circulation of film;
•             History, myth and identity in African film;
•             The representation of African cultures in film;
•             Audiences, reception and sites of spectatorship;
•             Indigenous language films and the problems of subtitles and illiteracy.
•             Morality and spirituality in African cinema;
•             Exhibition, financing and distribution of African film;
•             Cinema and digital technologies;
•             Film festivals and the development of national cinemas in Africa;
•             Revenue, business models and piracy
•             Auteur, film genres and form
•             Collaborative filmmaking in the global north/trans-national collaborations
•             African film philosophy
•             The image, sound, written and spoken word in filmic narratives
•             Institutions, policies and film agencies
 
 
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS
 
The deadline for submission of abstracts is Friday 8 June, 2012. Successful applicants will be notified by Monday 18 June, 2012. Abstracts should be 300 words long. They must include the title of the conference, presenter’s name, affiliation, email and postal address, together with the title of the paper. Please ensure when saving your abstract that your name is part of the file name. Please email your abstract to Helen Cohen, Events Administrator at: (journalism@westminster.ac.uk).
 
PROGRAMME AND REGISTRATION
 
This two day conference will take place on Saturday 10 and Sunday 11 November, 2012. The fee for registration (which applies to all participants, including presenters) will be £140, with a concessionary rate of £60 for students, to cover all conference documentation, refreshments and administration costs. Registration will open in September 2012.
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Call for Papers: Special Issue of Black Camera on Nollywood as a New Archive of Africa’s Worldliness, Deadline: 15 September 2012


CFP: Special Issue of Black Camera on Nollywood as a New Archive of Africa’s Worldliness

The cinema journal Black Camera invites submissions for a special
issue, or a section of a future issue, that will investigate
Nollywood, the Nigerian commercial movie industry, as a new archive of Africa’s worldliness. Inspired by the work of Achille Mbembe, this issue seeks to understand Nollywood as an everyday practice “through which Africans manage to recognize and maintain with the world an unprecedented familiarity” (Mbembe 2002). Nollywood’s significance, then, involves not only its staggering productivity and commercial success, but also encompasses its implicit challenge to dominant narratives that represent Africa as absolutely other or as defined by an essential difference.

We invite papers that put Nollywood in contact with current debates in film theory and world cinema studies, or that place Nollywood beside other transnational film and media industries so as to highlight its singularity and make visible a more variegated and complicated cultural ecology of globalization. We also welcome contributions that seek to understand Nollywood within the context of recent structural, technological, and ideological transformations associated with globalization and late capitalism and that explore Nollywood as shaped by its multiple circuits of consumption and production and by the global processes it participates in. We are interested in papers that attend to the aesthetics, stylistics, and imaginaries of Nollywood movies, with particular focus on the global popular and other discourses as reimagined and remixed by Nollywood.

Possible essay topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
Nollywood as a minor transnational practice; Nollywood and regional media flows in West Africa; affiliations between Nollywood and Hollywood, Bollywood or other commercial industries; Nollywood and the African diaspora; the transnational flow of Nollywood aesthetics; the New Nollywood; Nollywood and the “Worlding” of Africa; the Afropolis and Nollywood; video technology and Nollywood; Nollywood and transnational screening circuits; Nollywood co-productions;  Nollywood in South Africa; Nollywood in East Africa; cosmopolitan subjectivities and Nollywood; Nollywood and the governmentalities of neo-liberalism; the uneasy interaction of Nollywood and international film festivals.

In addition to essays, interviews and commentaries will be considered.

Essays should be 6,000-10,000 words, interviews 6,000 words, and commentaries 1,000-2,000 words.

Please submit completed essays, a 100-word abstract, a fifty-word
biography, and a CV by September 15th, 2012. Submissions should
conform to the most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.
Please see the Black Camera website for journal-specific guidelines:
http://www.indiana.edu/~blackcam/call/#guidelines

Direct all questions, correspondence, and submissions to guest editor Carmela Garritano (University of St. Thomas) at
cjgarritano@stthomas.edu.

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International Conference: Nollywood, Women, and Cultural Identity, at Benue State University, Makurdi, 8-11 May 2012


Nollywood, Women, and Cultural Identity

Call for papers: Everyday Media Culture in Africa. Conference at University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Abstract Deadline: 30 October 2011


Call for Papers: Beyond Normative Approaches: Everyday Media Culture in Africa

An international conference organized by the Department of Media Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan and with support from the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI), University of Westminster

Dates: 27-29 February 2012
Venue: University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Deadline for abstracts: 30 October 2011

We invite contributions that address the everyday lived experiences of Africans in their interaction with different kinds of media: old and new, state and private, elite and popular, global and national. All over the continent today, country by country, there are signs of growth and change-a buzz of energy stimulated, in part, by the rapid spread and impact of new mobile communication technologies and the new economic, political and social affordances which they help to create. The rise of these technologies, and the new forms of media practice and use associated with them, is in parallel with the emergence of new forms of commercial mediation and communications enterprises across the global South, which arguably complicate the role of the media in African cultures and societies.

Since media studies began in the 1970s, its object of study has changed in fundamental ways. Media were at first conceptualized almost wholly within the frame of the nation-state, its national politics and culture. The bulk of academic research on media and communication in Africa has studied media through the lens of media-state relations, hereby adopting liberal democracy as normative ideal and focusing on the potential contribution of African media to development and democratization. This approach has insufficiently looked at the actual role of media in African societies but instead focused on what roles media ought to play on the continent. Instead of understanding media on the continent on its own terms, scholars have often produced ahistorical accounts that posture as negative imprints of Western models of media-state relations. Furthermore, the heavy focus on media-state relations in studies on media in Africa has ignored both the way in which ordinary people relate to media and the increasingly important role of private capital and the market in the realm of African media.

Since the 1990s, the diffusion of continuing technological innovations in digital media and telecommunications, driven by the world economy, has changed the media landscape beyond recognition, producing the globalized world that all of us inhabit today. The question which then arises is what the study of media can tell us about Africa, in all its diversity, and the position of African societies in the world today. Among other issues, we invite participants to engage with one or more of the following questions:

Audiences, lived experience and changing notions of identity

– How can we research and theorize media cultures in today’s  Africa?

– What roles do different forms of media play in the everyday lives of Africans?

– How do global and national media contribute to changing notions of African identities?

Media, participation and resistance

– What role do old and new media play in forms of resistance on the continent?

– To what extent are media contributing to emerging participatory cultures in Africa?

– What does the diffusion and uptake of new media technologies tell us about social change taking place in Africa today?

Consumer culture and the media

– How can we understand the contribution of media to the rise of consumer cultures and consumption practices in Africa?

– What role do media and communications play in the increasing commodification of development?

– Who are the new entrepreneurial elites who are driving the diffusion of technological innovation in Africa?

For Africa-based scholars who would like to participate but require travel funding (primarily for airfare) to do so, please include a funding request with an estimated travel budget. A small amount of funding will be available to support presenters’ participation.

There will be a modest registration fee (R 175 for graduate students, R350 for faculty) to cover the costs of snacks and some meals.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should include the following: paper title, author, institutional affiliation and postal address, email address, abstract of no more than 300 words. Proposals should be sent on or before 30 October 2011 to Wendy Willems at: wendy.willems@wits.ac.za

Deadline for submission of abstract extended to 10 October for the Women in Northern Nigerian Literature and Film Conference at Kwara State University


Kwara State University has extended their call for abstracts deadline until 10 October 2011, for the Women in Literature and Film in Northern Nigeria Conference, that is to be held 29 November to 2 December 2011. This from the conference organizers.

The abstract deadline has been extended. One page abstracts are invited from interested participants on any aspect of the conference theme and sub-themes, to reach the organizers immediately but not later than October 10th, 2011, the extended submission deadline.

For more details on the conference theme, call for papers, and location, see the original post about the conference.

Call for Papers: “Nollywood and the Global South” a Special Issue of The Global South, Deadline for abstracts 4 November 2011


CFP: The Global South 6.2 (Fall 2012)
Nollywood and the Global South

The Global South is an interdisciplinary journal, published semiannually by Indiana University Press. The journal focuses on how world literatures and cultures respond to globalization. Its premise is that the various Souths苯rom the North American South to the European South, Latin and Central America, Africa, Asia, and Australia貞hare comparable experiences that differentiate them from mainstream and hegemonic cultures in their locations. Since many of these Souths share not necessarily a common wealth, but various issues of marginalization and inadequate access to means of production and amenities under globalization, TGS is concerned with the intersections among their experiences. The journal is interested in how authors, writers, and critics respond to issues of the environment; poverty; immigration; gender; race; hybridity; cultural formation and transformation; colonialism and postcolonialism; modernity and postmodernity; transatlantic encounters, homes, and diasporas; resistance and counter discourse; among others under the superordinate umbrella of globalization. This Call for Papers is for a special issue on Nollywood and the Global South.

Nollywood, the Nigerian film industry, is one of the fastest growing movie industries in the world. In terms of creativity and inventiveness, Nollywood movies provide a good example of Africans consuming what they produce. The responses of people of African descent in the Diaspora and in the Global South as well as those of people all over the world to the phenomenon of Nollywood raise critical social, economic, literary, and cultural questions about globalization and interculturalism. In this issue of The Global South, we invite essays from scholars working in all areas of African and film studies on all aspects of Nollywood, globalization, and the global south, including essays on the history and emergence of Nollywood, how Nollywood acts as an agent of globalization and how it contests globalization by promoting local discourses, how Nollywood functions as an alternative means of cultural representation, counter-discourse, and cultural renaissance, as well as articles on theory and aesthetics. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

History of Nollywood
The Future of Nollywood
Reality in/and Nollywood
Karma and Nollywood
African Morality and Nollywood
Nollywood and Auto/biography
Nollywood and Cultural Renaissance
Nollywood and Tradition
Nollywood and Religion
Nollywood and Race
Nollywood and Gender
Nollywood and Class
Nollywood and Ethnicity
Nollywood and Globalization
Nollywood and the Nigerian Music Industry
Nollywood and Aesthetics
Nollywood and Nigerian Politics
Nollywood and the African Diaspora
Nollywood, Hollywood, and Bollywood
Nollywood and Language
Nollywood and Orality
Nollywood and Madness
Nollywood and Cultural Conflict
Nollywood and Marriage
Nollywood and Crime
Nollywood and Reflections on Africa

This special issue of The Global South (co-edited by Adetayo Alabi, Ifeanyi Ezeonu, and Kolawole Olaiya) is scheduled for publication in Fall 2012. Please submit abstracts and a short bio by November 4, 2011, final drafts of essays by March 4, 2011, and inquiries to Adetayo Alabi, aalabi@olemiss.edu. Essays should be 25-35 double-spaced pages long and should follow the MLA style.

You can read more about The Global South at http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublication?journalCode=globalsouth

“NOLLYWOOD AND THEATRE FOR DEVELOPMENT (TFD)” a Conference at Ahmadu Bello University, 14-18 November 2011


SONTA 2011 CONFERENCE

AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY, ZARIA

 DATE
– NOVEMBER 14th – 18th, 2011

VENUE:
AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY, ZARIA, NIGERIA

THEME: NOLLYWOOD AND THEATRE FOR DEVELOPMENT (TFD):
EXPLORING THE BRIDGES OF INTERACTION

Context

By November 2011, Nigeria would hopefully be in the sixth month after another successful transition from one government to another. This would be the third in the series since the return to democratic rule in 1999. However, the burning issues will remain how well this journey has been. Some of the crucial issues that
will dominate discussions will be the conduct of the elections, the state of
Nigeria’s democracy so far, and this would be measured by the extent to which citizens are benefiting from the democratic dispensation. Also, some of the issues that will continue to remain in the front burner for many Nigerians would be how democracy translates into good governance, accountability and how to tackle corruption. For democracy itself means nothing if it cannot translate to better and improved livelihood for the citizens. Questions on the how corruption has become a key aspect of patronage system and the dominant trait of our politics, and the overall corrosive effect on national development as it undermines state capacity and efficient delivery of public services and goods are matters of concern.

Therefore, dominating national debates will be the effect of corruption and how it may destabilize and discredit the democratic project in the short and long run. The net effect of all these on livelihoods and well-being of the citizens are issues from which no one can run.

It is also of importance to ask what platforms to enlist in these national debates. Outside of the National Assemblies where politicians harangue each other, we believe that the academe is a critical site for these debates to be prosecuted – for
analysis, for enlightenment and to offer suggestions because we must continue
to take a political position either not to ‘siddon look’ (do nothing) or to
implicate ourselves in the action of building the nation called Nigeria. At
this point in our national debate two platforms that do offer avenues for
debate are silver screen and the rusty and dusty arenas in urban and rural
communities across Nigeria. These two platforms are Nollywood and Theatre for
Development (TfD).

The conference is interested in exploring the interactions between these platforms. Hence the theme ‘Nollywood and Theatre for Development (TfD): Exploring the Bridges of Interaction.’ This theme captures our thinking that there are issues that both forms can address. It is possible therefore that points of convergence exist between the two in issues and in methodologies. We hope that the 2011 conference will go beyond the debate focusing on difference, of arguments whether Nollywood has invalidated TfD, or whether one has more relevance in certain locations than the other. Beyond the arguments on confrontation, we should also be exploring bridges of interaction as we confront Nigeria’s journey to realizing its full potentials.

Sub Themes:

  • Nollywood and Political Awareness
  • The Aesthetics and Semiotics of Nigerian Home Movies
  • Nollywood and Nigerian Culture
  • Globalization and Imperialism of Nigerian Home Movies
  • Nollywood and Representation of Gender Issues
  • New Trends in TfD Practice
  • TfD and Nigerian Political Elite/Awareness
  • TfD and Exploration of Gender Issues
  • TfD and Cultural Development
  • Language of TfD and Nollywood
  • Music in TfD and Nollywood
  • Dance in TfD and Nollywood
  • The Political Economy of TfD and Nollywood
  • The Dynamics of Numemclature: Nollywood Vs Home movies
  • The Sociology of Nollywood and TfD production

ü  Conversation
Between Nollywood and TfD (Special Round Table)

Onokome Okome (Lead Presenter to set the tone), Tunde Kelani, Jonathan Haynes,  Abdallah Uba, Mahmood Ali Balogun, Ayo Akinwale, Dave Awam Ankpa, Steve Oga Abah, John Illah, Foluke Ogunleye, Adagbada, Zulu Adigwe, Obi Okoli

First Call for Abstract June 30th 2011

Second and Final Call for Abstract 30th August 2011

Final date for accepted full papers 15th October 2011

Registration: Local Participants N5, 000 Conference Fee, N5, 000 Membership (N10, 000) Total for Members whose Departments are registered

Departmental Registration: N10, 000

Foreign Participants: $100 Dollars Each

Local Participants can pay into the following account

Name of Account: Society of Nigerian Theatre Artists

Account Number: 2501250494120

Bank: Unity BankNig.Plc

Send abstracts
to sakafewo@yahoo.com, Sakafewo@gmail.com, oga.abah@googlemail.com, Ogaabah@yahoo.com, aba.ogah@gmail.com

Note: There will be no proxy presentations. Unlisted papers will also not be allowed for presentation

UPDATE: 14 September 2011 PROGRAMME OF EVENTS:

SONTA ANNUAL
CONFERENCE

2011 (NOV. 14 – 17)

A.B.U. ZARIA

PROGRAMME OF EVENTS

NOV. 14TH                                                            ARRIVAL/REGISTRATION

NOV. 15TH

9.-00  – 12.00                                       OPENING CEREMONY

Chair:

8.30am                                 –
Participants are seated

9.00am                                 –              invited guest/special guests are seated

9.30am                                 –              Principal officers of the university, HRH, the   Lead Presenters

9.35am                                 –              National Anthem

9.40am                                 –              Introduction

9.45am                                 –              Remarks by the chairman of the occasion

9.50am                                 –              Welcome by LOC chairman: Professor O S Abah

9.55am                                 –              Address by SONTA President: Professor Emman S Dandaura

10.00am                               –              Address by the VC, ABU: Prof. Abdullahi Mustapha

10.05am                               –              Introduction of Lead Paper Presenters: 30 Minutes each.

1.Mr Michael Etherton:  (TfD)

2.ProfessorOnokomeOkome:(Nollywood)Why teach Nollywood?

11.05 am                              –
Launching of Music album and Video Films by Theatre & Perf. Arts Dept

11.10am                               –              Vote of thanks by the Convener Professor S A Kafewo

11.05am – 12.30am         –              Refreshment,  Socializing leading to Lunch break

2.30 – 5.30PM                                    ROUND TABLE SESSION

Moderator Professor John E S Illah

TfD
Team

a)      Professor Oga S Abah

b)      Professor J Z Okwori

c)       Dr Torbalav Iorapuu

d)      Professor Dave Awam Ankpa

e)      Ross Kidd

f)       David Kerr

 

Nollywood Team

a)      Mr Emeka Mba

b)      Mr Segun Oyekunle

c)       Mr Mahmood Ali-Balogun

d)      Ms Zainab Bewell

e)      Professor Abdallah Uba

f)       Mr Sadiq Balewa

Rapporteur                                         a)Dr Charles Nwadigwe

b) Dr Doki A Gowon

NOV. 16TH

7.00 – 8.00AM                   Breakfast

1st
session     –      8.00 – 10.00

Theme:
TfD and Cultural Development

Chairman                                           Professor
Musa Dauda

  1. JanePlastow:                                     Towards a radical Philosophy for Theatre forDevelopment
  2. Aondawose Boh:                             Theatre for Development, Culture and the National Question
  3. Komolafe A. Michael:                     Social Development and Government Reluctance: TFD to the rescue
  4. Hussaini U. Tsaku                             TfD and Cultural Development
  5. Onogu Williams Sunday:               Challenges of Theatre for Development (TfD) and the Need for Conceptual and methodological Adjustments.
  6. Uwawah, Allero:                              Virtual Communities as Space for Theatre for Development   (TfD)
  7. Sylanvus P. Dangoji:                        Ajiko Shrine as an Instance of Nollywood’s Commentary on Nigerian Political Culture.

Rapporteur                                                         a) Diran Ademiju-Bepo

b) Adakole Oklobia Jnr

2nd
Session          10.00 – 12.00noon

Chairman               Professor Dapo Adelugba

  1. Steve Daniel:       Ahmadu Bello University Theatre Experiments, Greenbelt  Environment Initiative and Community groups: Case Study of the SECODA  Initiative
  2. Festus O. Idoko:        Development without Participation and or participation without Development: Interrogating the crisis of development in Kushe Community (near Kuru) Using the theatre for Development Approach as a Possible Panacea.
  3. James Luper Sokpo:  The Practice of community Theatre in Nigeria:
    A  Methodological Discourse.
  4. Nasir Taofiq Olaide:    Drama as Exploratory Paradigm in Lock-up Institutions; A Case Study of the Neuropsychiatric Hospital Aro, Abeokuta.
  5. Uzoji, Emmanuel Ebere:   Theatre and Peace building in Africa: The A-Mashish Street Theatre’s Panacea to Conflict Resolution in Darfur.
  6. Mbachaga, Desen Jonathan:        Theatre for Development Participatory Monitoring and Feedback:  The Example of Ikyaan Amua Communities in Benue State.
  7. Umar-Buratai, M. I.   Confrontation or Cooption: Reflections on the Tendencies and Dilemma of TfD as a Development Strategy

Rapporteur                                         a) Jamilah Aliyu Mohammed

b)Festus Idoko

3rd  Session12.00noon – 2pm

Theme:  Nollywood Vs. Theatre for Development

Chairman       Professor Ayo Akinwale

  1. Obaje Umolo Gabriel:                    Harmonizing
    the concepts of Nollywood with those of Theatre  for
    Development:  the Existentialist Perspective.
  2. Martins Adegbe Ayegba:     Alternative Futures:  Developing Theatre for Development (TfD)  Strategies for Nollywood in the New Dispensation.
    1. Israel Memriomame Wekpe& Ms. Owens Patricia ONI-EDIGIN: Of Nollywood’s Reality Vs Theatre for Development (TfD) Reality:  A Site Performance of Nigeria’s Reality.
    2. Shaibu Jummah Umar:    A dramatic means that builds bridges of interaction:  A Study of   Nollywood
      and Theatre for Development (TfD).
    3. Bode Ojoniyi:  Between Myth, Ideology and Intentionality in Nigerian Home Vidoeo
      and its implications for the future of TFD.
    4. Charles Okwuowulu:   The Aesthetics of Iconographic Visual Effects in Nollywood: The Nonlinear
      Editor’s Technique
    5. Adagbada Olufadekemi:  Seeking Interplay between Nollywood and Stage: Political                                                              Awarenessin Yoruba Films as a Study case.

Rapporteur                                                         a) Elisha Rwang

b) Abdulrasheed Adeoye

Launch break 2.00 –2.30pm

 4th Session         2.30 – 4.30pm

Theme: Nollywood and Representation of Gender
Issues

            Chairman:    Professor VS Dugga

  1. Oludolapo Ojediran:   Singing in different Tunes:  Nollywood’s Reflection on Gender, Language and Culture.
  2. Rasheedah Liman:    Re-thinking the role of Home Video and Women Battering in Nigeria.
  3. Jamila A. Mohammed:           Misrepresentation of Women in Nollywood.
  4. Gwar,E. Terngu:   TFD and Exploration of Gender Issues; Implication for Policy Development and Practice
  5. Barclays, Foubiri Ayakoroma,  Nollywood and Cultural Development: Milestones and Prospects for a Journey of the Future

6. Rasheed, Olaitan Lateef. & Kunle Abogunjoko    The Concept of “Deux-Ex-Machina” in Conflict Resolution in Selected Nollywood Movies

7. Ameh Dennis Akoh & Mary Okocha: No, I Don’t Watch Nigerian Films: Reception and Popularity of Nollywood Films among Select Nigerian University Students

Rapporteur                                                         a)Emmanuel Uzoji

b) Charles Okwuowulu

5th Session: 4.30pm – 6.30pm

  • Theme: The Dynamics of Nomenclature: Nollywood Vs Home movies

Chairman       Professor Augustine Ufua Enahoro

  1. Iloma. Richard:    The Arts of Editing and its impacts on film production in Nigeria: Case study of a selected Nollywood films.
  2. Okeke, Tochukwu, J.   Culture and Societal change:  Implications for
    the Sustained Growth of Nollywood
  3. Edum S. and Obire Dennis:   Nollywood and the Leadership Question: A Study of Selected Nigerian Video Films.
  4. Joy Anurika Udeh:  Nollywood Themes and Development.
  5. Ben Due Iyav:  Nollywood as a tool for the Promotion of Nigerian Culture:  A  Review of Challenges.
  6. Christine Odi:  Nollywood and the Nigerian Reality: (Culture in Action?) A Study   of Selected Nigerian Home Videos.
  7. Onyekaba Cornelius E.  Home Video and Multiculturalism in Nigeria: A Study of the  Impact of Nollywood films in Nigerian
    youth.

Rapporteur                                                 a) S Y Daniel

b) Ali Sule Ako

DAY THREE – 17/11/2011

Session 1:  8.00 – 10.00

  • Theme: The Political Economy of TfD and Nollywood

Chairman    Professor S A Kafewo

  1. Oladipo Kalejaiye: Soyinka’s Theatre of Revolution: A Political Lesson for  Nollywood
  2. Hammed Olutoba Lawal:  Political Sensitization in Bolaji Amusan’s Baba Gomina
  3. Ernest-Samuel, Gloria C.  Political Discourse through Nollywoods evolving Popular Arts. Uche Ogbuagu’s Okudi-over in Focus.
  4. Gowon Ama Doki  Political Control representing Nigerian Politics and Politicians on  the Screen.
  5. Emmanuel Uzoji: theatre, Terrorism and Genocide in Nigeria: An Examination of  Theatre for Transformative Peace and conflicts in Plateau State.
  6. Nwagbo Nnenyelike:  Towards
    theatre criticism of Nigerian Film: A Study of Barclay’s Ayakoroma’s
    Nollywood critical standpoint.

Rapporteur                                                         a) Ben Iyav Due

b)S M Bappa

Session 2  10.00 – 12.00

Theme:  Sociology of Nollywood and TfD production

Chairman    Professor E S Dandaura

  1. James L. S. and Lilian Y. I.  Theatre for Development(TFD) A Practice or a Strategy?
  2. Ali Sule Ako: Our Men Are too Hungry for power.  Adopting
    the Theatre for development (TFD)  approach to re-evaluate the
    challenges and prospects of the 35% affirmative Action.
  3. Law Ikay Ezeh: Nollywood: has it represented, promoted, propagated and developed Nigerian Culture”
  4. Onyekaba Cornelius: Image Management and the Portrayal of the
    Nigeria Police in  selected Popular Nigerian  home videos.
  5. Victor S. Dugga: Upping the Ante:  Creating a Centre for
    Exellence in Multimedia                                                                           Technology and Cinematography for Nigeria Higher Education.
  6. Igaba Ogbu Sunday:Towards Participatory Video for Community
    Health  communication.
  7. Adeisa Peter Bello:   Music, Dance and Ebira TFD: “Ataba and
    Mattaga” Plays in Focus.
  8. Rwang, Elisha D.  Development Agencies and the Quest for
    Development:  An Appraisal of Strategies of UNICEF assisted projects in Nigeria.

Rapporteur
a)Williams Onogu

b) Christine Odi

Session  3: 12.00 – 2.00pm

Theme: The Aesthetics and Semiotics of Nigerian Home Movies

  1. Egwemi O. P and Illah:    The Rise of Igala Home Video
  2. Ibrahim, D. Music and Dance in the Domestic Hausa Film
  3. Abubakar A. Liman:  Democracy, cultural Hegemony and the war
    against Hausa  Video films.
  4. Muhammad R. Isah:  Nuances of Interaction between Samaru Project Drama and the                                                                              Dan-Ibro Hausa film
  5. Ayo Akinwale:  Remunerations and Nigeria Actor in Yoruba Home Video productions
  6. Mohammed Inuwa U.   Nigeria Home Video Movies:  the Boom and the crisis/dilemma of content and social Relevance.
  7. Ellison Domkap:   Semiology and Aesthetics of Sound:  Interpreting
    History in JETA Amata’s The Amazing Grace.
  8. Abaya, A. Samson: A Critical Discourse analysis of Sawaroide, A Yoruba Play.

6-8pm AGM

Day 4 18th November Departure