Category Archives: Academic

Call for papers: Everyday Media Culture in Africa. Conference at University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Abstract Deadline: 30 October 2011


Call for Papers: Beyond Normative Approaches: Everyday Media Culture in Africa

An international conference organized by the Department of Media Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan and with support from the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI), University of Westminster

Dates: 27-29 February 2012
Venue: University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Deadline for abstracts: 30 October 2011

We invite contributions that address the everyday lived experiences of Africans in their interaction with different kinds of media: old and new, state and private, elite and popular, global and national. All over the continent today, country by country, there are signs of growth and change-a buzz of energy stimulated, in part, by the rapid spread and impact of new mobile communication technologies and the new economic, political and social affordances which they help to create. The rise of these technologies, and the new forms of media practice and use associated with them, is in parallel with the emergence of new forms of commercial mediation and communications enterprises across the global South, which arguably complicate the role of the media in African cultures and societies.

Since media studies began in the 1970s, its object of study has changed in fundamental ways. Media were at first conceptualized almost wholly within the frame of the nation-state, its national politics and culture. The bulk of academic research on media and communication in Africa has studied media through the lens of media-state relations, hereby adopting liberal democracy as normative ideal and focusing on the potential contribution of African media to development and democratization. This approach has insufficiently looked at the actual role of media in African societies but instead focused on what roles media ought to play on the continent. Instead of understanding media on the continent on its own terms, scholars have often produced ahistorical accounts that posture as negative imprints of Western models of media-state relations. Furthermore, the heavy focus on media-state relations in studies on media in Africa has ignored both the way in which ordinary people relate to media and the increasingly important role of private capital and the market in the realm of African media.

Since the 1990s, the diffusion of continuing technological innovations in digital media and telecommunications, driven by the world economy, has changed the media landscape beyond recognition, producing the globalized world that all of us inhabit today. The question which then arises is what the study of media can tell us about Africa, in all its diversity, and the position of African societies in the world today. Among other issues, we invite participants to engage with one or more of the following questions:

Audiences, lived experience and changing notions of identity

– How can we research and theorize media cultures in today’s  Africa?

– What roles do different forms of media play in the everyday lives of Africans?

– How do global and national media contribute to changing notions of African identities?

Media, participation and resistance

– What role do old and new media play in forms of resistance on the continent?

– To what extent are media contributing to emerging participatory cultures in Africa?

– What does the diffusion and uptake of new media technologies tell us about social change taking place in Africa today?

Consumer culture and the media

– How can we understand the contribution of media to the rise of consumer cultures and consumption practices in Africa?

– What role do media and communications play in the increasing commodification of development?

– Who are the new entrepreneurial elites who are driving the diffusion of technological innovation in Africa?

For Africa-based scholars who would like to participate but require travel funding (primarily for airfare) to do so, please include a funding request with an estimated travel budget. A small amount of funding will be available to support presenters’ participation.

There will be a modest registration fee (R 175 for graduate students, R350 for faculty) to cover the costs of snacks and some meals.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should include the following: paper title, author, institutional affiliation and postal address, email address, abstract of no more than 300 words. Proposals should be sent on or before 30 October 2011 to Wendy Willems at: wendy.willems@wits.ac.za

Deadline for submission of abstract extended to 10 October for the Women in Northern Nigerian Literature and Film Conference at Kwara State University


Kwara State University has extended their call for abstracts deadline until 10 October 2011, for the Women in Literature and Film in Northern Nigeria Conference, that is to be held 29 November to 2 December 2011. This from the conference organizers.

The abstract deadline has been extended. One page abstracts are invited from interested participants on any aspect of the conference theme and sub-themes, to reach the organizers immediately but not later than October 10th, 2011, the extended submission deadline.

For more details on the conference theme, call for papers, and location, see the original post about the conference.

Call for Papers: “Nollywood and the Global South” a Special Issue of The Global South, Deadline for abstracts 4 November 2011


CFP: The Global South 6.2 (Fall 2012)
Nollywood and the Global South

The Global South is an interdisciplinary journal, published semiannually by Indiana University Press. The journal focuses on how world literatures and cultures respond to globalization. Its premise is that the various Souths苯rom the North American South to the European South, Latin and Central America, Africa, Asia, and Australia貞hare comparable experiences that differentiate them from mainstream and hegemonic cultures in their locations. Since many of these Souths share not necessarily a common wealth, but various issues of marginalization and inadequate access to means of production and amenities under globalization, TGS is concerned with the intersections among their experiences. The journal is interested in how authors, writers, and critics respond to issues of the environment; poverty; immigration; gender; race; hybridity; cultural formation and transformation; colonialism and postcolonialism; modernity and postmodernity; transatlantic encounters, homes, and diasporas; resistance and counter discourse; among others under the superordinate umbrella of globalization. This Call for Papers is for a special issue on Nollywood and the Global South.

Nollywood, the Nigerian film industry, is one of the fastest growing movie industries in the world. In terms of creativity and inventiveness, Nollywood movies provide a good example of Africans consuming what they produce. The responses of people of African descent in the Diaspora and in the Global South as well as those of people all over the world to the phenomenon of Nollywood raise critical social, economic, literary, and cultural questions about globalization and interculturalism. In this issue of The Global South, we invite essays from scholars working in all areas of African and film studies on all aspects of Nollywood, globalization, and the global south, including essays on the history and emergence of Nollywood, how Nollywood acts as an agent of globalization and how it contests globalization by promoting local discourses, how Nollywood functions as an alternative means of cultural representation, counter-discourse, and cultural renaissance, as well as articles on theory and aesthetics. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

History of Nollywood
The Future of Nollywood
Reality in/and Nollywood
Karma and Nollywood
African Morality and Nollywood
Nollywood and Auto/biography
Nollywood and Cultural Renaissance
Nollywood and Tradition
Nollywood and Religion
Nollywood and Race
Nollywood and Gender
Nollywood and Class
Nollywood and Ethnicity
Nollywood and Globalization
Nollywood and the Nigerian Music Industry
Nollywood and Aesthetics
Nollywood and Nigerian Politics
Nollywood and the African Diaspora
Nollywood, Hollywood, and Bollywood
Nollywood and Language
Nollywood and Orality
Nollywood and Madness
Nollywood and Cultural Conflict
Nollywood and Marriage
Nollywood and Crime
Nollywood and Reflections on Africa

This special issue of The Global South (co-edited by Adetayo Alabi, Ifeanyi Ezeonu, and Kolawole Olaiya) is scheduled for publication in Fall 2012. Please submit abstracts and a short bio by November 4, 2011, final drafts of essays by March 4, 2011, and inquiries to Adetayo Alabi, aalabi@olemiss.edu. Essays should be 25-35 double-spaced pages long and should follow the MLA style.

You can read more about The Global South at http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublication?journalCode=globalsouth

“NOLLYWOOD AND THEATRE FOR DEVELOPMENT (TFD)” a Conference at Ahmadu Bello University, 14-18 November 2011


SONTA 2011 CONFERENCE

AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY, ZARIA

 DATE
– NOVEMBER 14th – 18th, 2011

VENUE:
AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY, ZARIA, NIGERIA

THEME: NOLLYWOOD AND THEATRE FOR DEVELOPMENT (TFD):
EXPLORING THE BRIDGES OF INTERACTION

Context

By November 2011, Nigeria would hopefully be in the sixth month after another successful transition from one government to another. This would be the third in the series since the return to democratic rule in 1999. However, the burning issues will remain how well this journey has been. Some of the crucial issues that
will dominate discussions will be the conduct of the elections, the state of
Nigeria’s democracy so far, and this would be measured by the extent to which citizens are benefiting from the democratic dispensation. Also, some of the issues that will continue to remain in the front burner for many Nigerians would be how democracy translates into good governance, accountability and how to tackle corruption. For democracy itself means nothing if it cannot translate to better and improved livelihood for the citizens. Questions on the how corruption has become a key aspect of patronage system and the dominant trait of our politics, and the overall corrosive effect on national development as it undermines state capacity and efficient delivery of public services and goods are matters of concern.

Therefore, dominating national debates will be the effect of corruption and how it may destabilize and discredit the democratic project in the short and long run. The net effect of all these on livelihoods and well-being of the citizens are issues from which no one can run.

It is also of importance to ask what platforms to enlist in these national debates. Outside of the National Assemblies where politicians harangue each other, we believe that the academe is a critical site for these debates to be prosecuted – for
analysis, for enlightenment and to offer suggestions because we must continue
to take a political position either not to ‘siddon look’ (do nothing) or to
implicate ourselves in the action of building the nation called Nigeria. At
this point in our national debate two platforms that do offer avenues for
debate are silver screen and the rusty and dusty arenas in urban and rural
communities across Nigeria. These two platforms are Nollywood and Theatre for
Development (TfD).

The conference is interested in exploring the interactions between these platforms. Hence the theme ‘Nollywood and Theatre for Development (TfD): Exploring the Bridges of Interaction.’ This theme captures our thinking that there are issues that both forms can address. It is possible therefore that points of convergence exist between the two in issues and in methodologies. We hope that the 2011 conference will go beyond the debate focusing on difference, of arguments whether Nollywood has invalidated TfD, or whether one has more relevance in certain locations than the other. Beyond the arguments on confrontation, we should also be exploring bridges of interaction as we confront Nigeria’s journey to realizing its full potentials.

Sub Themes:

  • Nollywood and Political Awareness
  • The Aesthetics and Semiotics of Nigerian Home Movies
  • Nollywood and Nigerian Culture
  • Globalization and Imperialism of Nigerian Home Movies
  • Nollywood and Representation of Gender Issues
  • New Trends in TfD Practice
  • TfD and Nigerian Political Elite/Awareness
  • TfD and Exploration of Gender Issues
  • TfD and Cultural Development
  • Language of TfD and Nollywood
  • Music in TfD and Nollywood
  • Dance in TfD and Nollywood
  • The Political Economy of TfD and Nollywood
  • The Dynamics of Numemclature: Nollywood Vs Home movies
  • The Sociology of Nollywood and TfD production

ü  Conversation
Between Nollywood and TfD (Special Round Table)

Onokome Okome (Lead Presenter to set the tone), Tunde Kelani, Jonathan Haynes,  Abdallah Uba, Mahmood Ali Balogun, Ayo Akinwale, Dave Awam Ankpa, Steve Oga Abah, John Illah, Foluke Ogunleye, Adagbada, Zulu Adigwe, Obi Okoli

First Call for Abstract June 30th 2011

Second and Final Call for Abstract 30th August 2011

Final date for accepted full papers 15th October 2011

Registration: Local Participants N5, 000 Conference Fee, N5, 000 Membership (N10, 000) Total for Members whose Departments are registered

Departmental Registration: N10, 000

Foreign Participants: $100 Dollars Each

Local Participants can pay into the following account

Name of Account: Society of Nigerian Theatre Artists

Account Number: 2501250494120

Bank: Unity BankNig.Plc

Send abstracts
to sakafewo@yahoo.com, Sakafewo@gmail.com, oga.abah@googlemail.com, Ogaabah@yahoo.com, aba.ogah@gmail.com

Note: There will be no proxy presentations. Unlisted papers will also not be allowed for presentation

UPDATE: 14 September 2011 PROGRAMME OF EVENTS:

SONTA ANNUAL
CONFERENCE

2011 (NOV. 14 – 17)

A.B.U. ZARIA

PROGRAMME OF EVENTS

NOV. 14TH                                                            ARRIVAL/REGISTRATION

NOV. 15TH

9.-00  – 12.00                                       OPENING CEREMONY

Chair:

8.30am                                 –
Participants are seated

9.00am                                 –              invited guest/special guests are seated

9.30am                                 –              Principal officers of the university, HRH, the   Lead Presenters

9.35am                                 –              National Anthem

9.40am                                 –              Introduction

9.45am                                 –              Remarks by the chairman of the occasion

9.50am                                 –              Welcome by LOC chairman: Professor O S Abah

9.55am                                 –              Address by SONTA President: Professor Emman S Dandaura

10.00am                               –              Address by the VC, ABU: Prof. Abdullahi Mustapha

10.05am                               –              Introduction of Lead Paper Presenters: 30 Minutes each.

1.Mr Michael Etherton:  (TfD)

2.ProfessorOnokomeOkome:(Nollywood)Why teach Nollywood?

11.05 am                              –
Launching of Music album and Video Films by Theatre & Perf. Arts Dept

11.10am                               –              Vote of thanks by the Convener Professor S A Kafewo

11.05am – 12.30am         –              Refreshment,  Socializing leading to Lunch break

2.30 – 5.30PM                                    ROUND TABLE SESSION

Moderator Professor John E S Illah

TfD
Team

a)      Professor Oga S Abah

b)      Professor J Z Okwori

c)       Dr Torbalav Iorapuu

d)      Professor Dave Awam Ankpa

e)      Ross Kidd

f)       David Kerr

 

Nollywood Team

a)      Mr Emeka Mba

b)      Mr Segun Oyekunle

c)       Mr Mahmood Ali-Balogun

d)      Ms Zainab Bewell

e)      Professor Abdallah Uba

f)       Mr Sadiq Balewa

Rapporteur                                         a)Dr Charles Nwadigwe

b) Dr Doki A Gowon

NOV. 16TH

7.00 – 8.00AM                   Breakfast

1st
session     –      8.00 – 10.00

Theme:
TfD and Cultural Development

Chairman                                           Professor
Musa Dauda

  1. JanePlastow:                                     Towards a radical Philosophy for Theatre forDevelopment
  2. Aondawose Boh:                             Theatre for Development, Culture and the National Question
  3. Komolafe A. Michael:                     Social Development and Government Reluctance: TFD to the rescue
  4. Hussaini U. Tsaku                             TfD and Cultural Development
  5. Onogu Williams Sunday:               Challenges of Theatre for Development (TfD) and the Need for Conceptual and methodological Adjustments.
  6. Uwawah, Allero:                              Virtual Communities as Space for Theatre for Development   (TfD)
  7. Sylanvus P. Dangoji:                        Ajiko Shrine as an Instance of Nollywood’s Commentary on Nigerian Political Culture.

Rapporteur                                                         a) Diran Ademiju-Bepo

b) Adakole Oklobia Jnr

2nd
Session          10.00 – 12.00noon

Chairman               Professor Dapo Adelugba

  1. Steve Daniel:       Ahmadu Bello University Theatre Experiments, Greenbelt  Environment Initiative and Community groups: Case Study of the SECODA  Initiative
  2. Festus O. Idoko:        Development without Participation and or participation without Development: Interrogating the crisis of development in Kushe Community (near Kuru) Using the theatre for Development Approach as a Possible Panacea.
  3. James Luper Sokpo:  The Practice of community Theatre in Nigeria:
    A  Methodological Discourse.
  4. Nasir Taofiq Olaide:    Drama as Exploratory Paradigm in Lock-up Institutions; A Case Study of the Neuropsychiatric Hospital Aro, Abeokuta.
  5. Uzoji, Emmanuel Ebere:   Theatre and Peace building in Africa: The A-Mashish Street Theatre’s Panacea to Conflict Resolution in Darfur.
  6. Mbachaga, Desen Jonathan:        Theatre for Development Participatory Monitoring and Feedback:  The Example of Ikyaan Amua Communities in Benue State.
  7. Umar-Buratai, M. I.   Confrontation or Cooption: Reflections on the Tendencies and Dilemma of TfD as a Development Strategy

Rapporteur                                         a) Jamilah Aliyu Mohammed

b)Festus Idoko

3rd  Session12.00noon – 2pm

Theme:  Nollywood Vs. Theatre for Development

Chairman       Professor Ayo Akinwale

  1. Obaje Umolo Gabriel:                    Harmonizing
    the concepts of Nollywood with those of Theatre  for
    Development:  the Existentialist Perspective.
  2. Martins Adegbe Ayegba:     Alternative Futures:  Developing Theatre for Development (TfD)  Strategies for Nollywood in the New Dispensation.
    1. Israel Memriomame Wekpe& Ms. Owens Patricia ONI-EDIGIN: Of Nollywood’s Reality Vs Theatre for Development (TfD) Reality:  A Site Performance of Nigeria’s Reality.
    2. Shaibu Jummah Umar:    A dramatic means that builds bridges of interaction:  A Study of   Nollywood
      and Theatre for Development (TfD).
    3. Bode Ojoniyi:  Between Myth, Ideology and Intentionality in Nigerian Home Vidoeo
      and its implications for the future of TFD.
    4. Charles Okwuowulu:   The Aesthetics of Iconographic Visual Effects in Nollywood: The Nonlinear
      Editor’s Technique
    5. Adagbada Olufadekemi:  Seeking Interplay between Nollywood and Stage: Political                                                              Awarenessin Yoruba Films as a Study case.

Rapporteur                                                         a) Elisha Rwang

b) Abdulrasheed Adeoye

Launch break 2.00 –2.30pm

 4th Session         2.30 – 4.30pm

Theme: Nollywood and Representation of Gender
Issues

            Chairman:    Professor VS Dugga

  1. Oludolapo Ojediran:   Singing in different Tunes:  Nollywood’s Reflection on Gender, Language and Culture.
  2. Rasheedah Liman:    Re-thinking the role of Home Video and Women Battering in Nigeria.
  3. Jamila A. Mohammed:           Misrepresentation of Women in Nollywood.
  4. Gwar,E. Terngu:   TFD and Exploration of Gender Issues; Implication for Policy Development and Practice
  5. Barclays, Foubiri Ayakoroma,  Nollywood and Cultural Development: Milestones and Prospects for a Journey of the Future

6. Rasheed, Olaitan Lateef. & Kunle Abogunjoko    The Concept of “Deux-Ex-Machina” in Conflict Resolution in Selected Nollywood Movies

7. Ameh Dennis Akoh & Mary Okocha: No, I Don’t Watch Nigerian Films: Reception and Popularity of Nollywood Films among Select Nigerian University Students

Rapporteur                                                         a)Emmanuel Uzoji

b) Charles Okwuowulu

5th Session: 4.30pm – 6.30pm

  • Theme: The Dynamics of Nomenclature: Nollywood Vs Home movies

Chairman       Professor Augustine Ufua Enahoro

  1. Iloma. Richard:    The Arts of Editing and its impacts on film production in Nigeria: Case study of a selected Nollywood films.
  2. Okeke, Tochukwu, J.   Culture and Societal change:  Implications for
    the Sustained Growth of Nollywood
  3. Edum S. and Obire Dennis:   Nollywood and the Leadership Question: A Study of Selected Nigerian Video Films.
  4. Joy Anurika Udeh:  Nollywood Themes and Development.
  5. Ben Due Iyav:  Nollywood as a tool for the Promotion of Nigerian Culture:  A  Review of Challenges.
  6. Christine Odi:  Nollywood and the Nigerian Reality: (Culture in Action?) A Study   of Selected Nigerian Home Videos.
  7. Onyekaba Cornelius E.  Home Video and Multiculturalism in Nigeria: A Study of the  Impact of Nollywood films in Nigerian
    youth.

Rapporteur                                                 a) S Y Daniel

b) Ali Sule Ako

DAY THREE – 17/11/2011

Session 1:  8.00 – 10.00

  • Theme: The Political Economy of TfD and Nollywood

Chairman    Professor S A Kafewo

  1. Oladipo Kalejaiye: Soyinka’s Theatre of Revolution: A Political Lesson for  Nollywood
  2. Hammed Olutoba Lawal:  Political Sensitization in Bolaji Amusan’s Baba Gomina
  3. Ernest-Samuel, Gloria C.  Political Discourse through Nollywoods evolving Popular Arts. Uche Ogbuagu’s Okudi-over in Focus.
  4. Gowon Ama Doki  Political Control representing Nigerian Politics and Politicians on  the Screen.
  5. Emmanuel Uzoji: theatre, Terrorism and Genocide in Nigeria: An Examination of  Theatre for Transformative Peace and conflicts in Plateau State.
  6. Nwagbo Nnenyelike:  Towards
    theatre criticism of Nigerian Film: A Study of Barclay’s Ayakoroma’s
    Nollywood critical standpoint.

Rapporteur                                                         a) Ben Iyav Due

b)S M Bappa

Session 2  10.00 – 12.00

Theme:  Sociology of Nollywood and TfD production

Chairman    Professor E S Dandaura

  1. James L. S. and Lilian Y. I.  Theatre for Development(TFD) A Practice or a Strategy?
  2. Ali Sule Ako: Our Men Are too Hungry for power.  Adopting
    the Theatre for development (TFD)  approach to re-evaluate the
    challenges and prospects of the 35% affirmative Action.
  3. Law Ikay Ezeh: Nollywood: has it represented, promoted, propagated and developed Nigerian Culture”
  4. Onyekaba Cornelius: Image Management and the Portrayal of the
    Nigeria Police in  selected Popular Nigerian  home videos.
  5. Victor S. Dugga: Upping the Ante:  Creating a Centre for
    Exellence in Multimedia                                                                           Technology and Cinematography for Nigeria Higher Education.
  6. Igaba Ogbu Sunday:Towards Participatory Video for Community
    Health  communication.
  7. Adeisa Peter Bello:   Music, Dance and Ebira TFD: “Ataba and
    Mattaga” Plays in Focus.
  8. Rwang, Elisha D.  Development Agencies and the Quest for
    Development:  An Appraisal of Strategies of UNICEF assisted projects in Nigeria.

Rapporteur
a)Williams Onogu

b) Christine Odi

Session  3: 12.00 – 2.00pm

Theme: The Aesthetics and Semiotics of Nigerian Home Movies

  1. Egwemi O. P and Illah:    The Rise of Igala Home Video
  2. Ibrahim, D. Music and Dance in the Domestic Hausa Film
  3. Abubakar A. Liman:  Democracy, cultural Hegemony and the war
    against Hausa  Video films.
  4. Muhammad R. Isah:  Nuances of Interaction between Samaru Project Drama and the                                                                              Dan-Ibro Hausa film
  5. Ayo Akinwale:  Remunerations and Nigeria Actor in Yoruba Home Video productions
  6. Mohammed Inuwa U.   Nigeria Home Video Movies:  the Boom and the crisis/dilemma of content and social Relevance.
  7. Ellison Domkap:   Semiology and Aesthetics of Sound:  Interpreting
    History in JETA Amata’s The Amazing Grace.
  8. Abaya, A. Samson: A Critical Discourse analysis of Sawaroide, A Yoruba Play.

6-8pm AGM

Day 4 18th November Departure

Call for papers for an International Conference on the Theorization and Classification of African Regional Movies. Abstract Deadline: 20 September 2011


From the Society of Movie Scholars:

African movies across its regions have grown to the extent that there is need to critically do their in-depth studies with the purpose of generating theories on their packaging, analysis and proper classification into genres. Most movies produced in Africa are packaged without recourse to definite theories. Broadly speaking, most of the movies can be categorized into three groups namely, cultural or epic; modern and religious movies. While the religious and cultural movies could be in local or foreign languages, modern movies are so described because they are often located in the context of urban or rural populace and are produced in foreign or local languages, treating themes bothering on modern issues. But where they are in local languages, they are often lazed with Pidgin English or code mixed. However, these groupings possess the tendency to overlap if these categories are to be retained. Thus, it is difficult to arrogate to these groupings as genres on their own, more so that these grading are not guided by definite theories.

To define these groups effectively therefore, it might be necessary to do a close survey of their constituents. This is when the components can be highlighted into specific genres for stimulating and rich academic exercise. It is expected as the outcome of the exercise that specialization, originality and scope-widening and thus further ground for employment creation and legitimacy of production and its development would be engendered. Then practitioners’ specializations on specific genres would increase, and the tendency to recycle old ideas for new creations would be reduced.
This conference is therefore organized with the intent of gathering interested scholars and practitioners within and outside Africa to rub minds so as to evolve specific theories of packaging, analysis, and map out what genres African movies could be grouped. Taking a leap from the fact that movies are audio-visualisation of literature and literary texts and are analysed based on definite theories, the objective therefore is to cut a niche for African movies like literature, and place them strategically in the world movie categorizations but based on African development ideals and thus globalise what hitherto were local mediations.

In view of the above, abstracts are invited from academics, media industry professionals, movie producers, distributors, government agencies, policymakers, movie regulators, agencies, donors, civil society organisations, independent consultants, research groups and students, on any aspects of the under listed sub-themes. Such abstracts which should not exceed 200 words should be based on the analysis of select movies that fall within the sub-themes. This would eventually argue out the basis for specified theories and why the movie should be classified within the genres that the scholar is advocating. Contributors should however not forget to state under which sub-theme they are submitting their abstract.
Abstracts are to be sent to our email address: moviescholars@gmail.com on or before September 20th 2011, while full paper must reach us before September 30th, 2011.

Sub-themes
Below are the likely, but by no means the only sub-themes on which abstracts can be submitted.
Trends in movie Theories.
Existing Literary Theories and the need or not, for distinct African movie theories.
Generating theories on African movies.
Emergent genres in African movies.
Movies and the relevance of African-specific genres.
Classifying African urban and rural movies.
Gender and social issues in African movies, need for classical genrization.
War and crime movies and proper classification.
Travel movies and issues of depiction.
African movies and the global media culture.
Representation of economic and political issues in African movies
Africans’ contributions to the Theories of Gaze.
Sociology and Psychology of African movies.
Conference Dates: October 27-29, 2011
Venue: Osun State University, Osogbo; Nigeria.
Proposals should include abstract title, author’s name, address, telephone number, email address, and institutional affiliation.
Conference fee: A non-refundable registration fee of N15, 000 or (USD 250, BP150 for participants from the US, Europe, and other African countries). This must be paid immediately when an abstract is accepted. It is expected that all participants will raise the funding to attend the conference please.
Enquiries:
For more details, please contact any of the following:
*Kayode Animasaun, PhD: College of Humanities and Culture Osun State University, Ikire Campus, Ikire. Convener and Chairman LOC:
+2348073787551, drkayanimasaun@gmail.Com
*Gloria Ernest-Samuel, Imo State University Owerri- Sec. LOC
+2348035085625, gloimsu@yahoo.com
*Ameh Akoh PhD H.O.D Languages and Linguistics Department, Osun State University, Ikire Campus, Ikire
: +2348035992490, amehakoh@yahoo.co.uk

For more details, please visit the website:
http://www.moviescholars.org

 

Call for Papers: African Music in the 21st Century–an Iconic Turn?–Mainz, Germany, Abstract Deadline: 15 September 2011


Call for Papers
African Music in the 21st Century – An Iconic Turn?
An International Symposium Celebrating the 21st Anniversary of the African Music Archives Mainz (AMA)

To be held at: Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany. June 13th – 16th 2012
Convenors: Hauke Dorsch, Matthias Krings

Since the advent of the 21st century and the proliferation of digital media a shift in the consumption and marketing of music in a number of African countries occurred: Videos gained an increasing importance. Today, Video-CDs and DVDs are widely sold in African cities, bars and restaurants show music clips and music casting shows on TV, music videos are available online through sites like youtube, but also via homepages and blogs devoted to artists, genres, and (at least ideally) music of the entire continent.

Due to this online availability and easy circulation of discs the visual aspects of music, especially dance styles, clothing fashions, coiffure spread more easily and rapidly than ever before between
different African countries and between African and its Diaspora. For example, migrants stay up to date with regards to musical and fashion trends in their respective countries of origin thanks to these videos. Prior to the mediatisation of African music through visual technologies, dance styles could only be transmitted through the presence of human bodies. Due to the proliferation of videos African dance and music travel trans-nationally on South-South and South-North axes at an accelerated speed.

So far, the pictorial turn (Mitchell) or iconic turn (Boehm) in Cultural Studies informed only few studies on African music. Consequently, the change following the digitisation and video-isation of the production and dissemination of African music is still under-researched. Taking music videos as its vantage point, this symposium will look at visual aspects of the performance and analysis of music more generally.

We invite young researchers and established scholars to present papers on the different ways music in Africa (and beyond) is interpreted, illustrated, translated or extended in its meaning by visual representations. These may refer to the analysis of individual videos, the comparison of a number of videos, or genres, changing trends of video aesthetics, the convergence of visual and aesthetic trends from elsewhere – in Africa and beyond (i.e. MTV, Bollywood, etc.). Furthermore, papers on the transformation (or even emergence) of music industries in Africa due to the impact of the visual are welcome. How are music videos produced on the ground? Who are the agents of the iconic turn in African music? How does music television support the iconic turn in African music? Finally, we invite papers on other aspects of the visual in music, performance (i.e. looking at costumes, stage shows,
stage lighting, etc.), on festivals and of course dance.

The symposium will celebrate the African Music Archives’ 21st anniversary. The AMA hosts Germany’s largest collection of recordings of African popular music. It includes roughly 10.000 recordings, from shellac records of the 1950s, to vinyl discs and singles from the 1960s to the 1990s, to music cassettes of the 1980s and 90s, to recent CDs, VideoCDs and DVDs.

The symposium will be hosted by the African Music Archives, Department of Anthropology and African Studies, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

Please submit your proposal no later than Sept., 15th 2011 and your full paper no later than May, 23rd 2012 to Hauke Dorsch dorschh@uni-mainz.de.

Symposium on Popular Culture and Performance in Africa, University of Ibadan, Abstract Deadline September 30, 2011


From the academic list-serve H-Net:

In spotlighting the contributions of Sola Olorunyomi – author of the seminal Afrobeat!: Fela and the Imagined Continent and other influential texts – to literary and cultural studies, this colloquium intends to incite a debate around the ferment that Olorunyomi has generated as an idea, a scholar, a teacher within and outside the classroom, a performer, a social activist and a fifty-year-long insurrectionary event.

Popular culture and performance in Africa, more intently, are isolated as the hub around which the colloquium’s sub-themes will revolve. We also want to look, beyond the normative cultural forms, at para-artistic sites such as television reality, telephony, virtual interaction (Facebook, Twitter, etc.), open-market hawking, etc. The colloquium’s immediate objective is to update critical engagements with popular modes of culture, taking into consideration the recent emergence of new forms such as hip-hop, on the one hand, and the transformation of other forms such as home video culture as exemplified by Nollywood, on the other.We therefore seek panel and individual presentations from scholars and practitioners that address issues relating, but not limited, to the following:

– Performance (Music, Drama, Disc Jockeying, etc.)
– Virtual Communication/ Cyberculture
– Reality Television
– Telephony
– Advertising
– Stand-up Comedy
– Slogans
– Home Video
– Football Fandom
– Body Art
– Fashion

Abstracts of not more that 250 words should be sent as email attachments to olorunyomiat50@yahoo.com. Deadline: Friday, September 30, 2011 (12 midnight, Nigerian time). We will respond to applicants regarding acceptance not later than Monday, October 3, 2011.

The colloquium will hold at the University of Ibadan in late November, 2011. A festschrift of presented papers will be published afterwards.

Senayon Olaoluwa (PhD Wits), Department of Languages and Linguistics, Osun State University or Tunji Azeez (PhD Ibadan), Department of Theatre Arts and Music, Lagos State University.

Call for papers: 2nd Global Conference on Urban Popcultures, Prague, Czech Republic, Deadline for abstracts: 30 September 2011


Call for papers copied below:

Call for Papers

2nd Global Conference

uplogo

Friday 9th March – Sunday 11th March 2012
Prague, Czech Republic


upcfpThis inter- and multi-disciplinary conference aims to examine, explore and critically engage with issues related to urban life. The project will promote the ongoing analysis of the varied creative trends and alternative cultural movements that comprise urban popultures and subcultures. In particular the conference will encourage equally theoretical and practical debates which surround the cultural and political contexts within which alternative urban subcultures are flourishing.

Papers, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to any of the following themes:

1. Popular, Alternative, and Underground Music Cultures
Alternative and Underground Dance, Electronica, Hip Hop, Gothic, Punk and Post-Rock Scenes. Local, Regional, and Global Scenes. The Mass-Appropriation of Underground Music. Independent Music Cultures. Popular Music Theory.

2. Subcultures, Communities, and Codes
Underground and Alternative Ideologies and Lifestyles. Issues of Gender, Sexuality, and Identity. The Avantgarde and Urban Codes. Urban Religion and Religious Expressions. D.I.Y.

3. Theories and Critical Studies of Popular Culture
Histories, Representations, and Discourses on Independent Scenes. The Frankfurt School. The Visual Turn. Urban Intertextualities and Intermedialities. Cultural Appropriations. Postmodernity and Beyond.

4. Popular and Subversive Expressions in Fashion, Art, Film, and Literature
Urban and Contemporary Life and Themes Considered in Music, Literature, Art and Film. Urban Fashion, Style, and Branding. Pop Art. Graffiti. Low vs. High Culture.

5. The City as Creative Subject/Object
Virtual Urbanity – Online Communities and the Impact of Social Networking. Urban Identity and Membership. Globalization/Localization of Urban Experience. Recent trends in Copyright/Copyleft. The Role of Internet in the Transformation of Music Industry. The Impact of User-generated Content.

6. Conflict, Popular Revolt, and Politics
Music and Politics. Race and Music Styles. Music Revolutions. Generational Conflicts. Class Divisions. Ageing Music Fans and Cross-generational Cool. New Schools vs. Old Schools.

7. Popular Culture Online and in Massmedia
The Visual Aspects of Urban Entertainment. The Evolution of Music and Thematic Television. Media Structure of Music Video. Explicit TV and Censorship.

300 word abstracts should be   submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. All submissions are minimally   double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted   for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the   Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats   with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12)   and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters   or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge  receipt  and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not  receive a  reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive  your  proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to  look for  an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs
Jordan Copeland
La Salle University,
Philadelphia, USA

Daniel Riha
Hub Leader (Cyber), Inter-Disciplinary.Net
Charles University,
Prague, Czech Republic

Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Network Leader
Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
Freeland, Oxfordshire, UK

The conference is part of the ‘Critical Issues’ programme of research projects. It aims to bring together   people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore   various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be  eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited  for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s) or for  inclusion in a new Cyber journal (launching 2011).

For more information about the conference or submission, see the original call for papers here.  For more on the ongoing Urban Popcultures research project, see the website here.

The Hollywood Reporter’s Best 25 Film School Rankings


For those interested in film school possibilities, here is the Hollywood Reporter‘s ranking of what it consideres to be the top 25 film schools in the world. As with any ranking, it must be taken with a grain of salt (most of the schools listed are in the United States [and the majority in the state of California], with only one in Asia, and four in Europe), but of particular interest to Nigerian filmmakers may be the less expensive non-American schools on this list.

To read the entire ranking which The Hollywood Reporter states is its “inaugural list (comprised with help from industry insiders) of the world’s best” with details on each school, click through to the Hollywood Reporter article. I’ve listed the schools from the article here with links to each university.

1. American Film Institute (Los Angeles, California, USA)

2. University of Southern California (Los Angeles, California, USA)

3. Beijing Film Academy (Beijing, China)

4. New York University Tisch School of the Arts (Manhattan, New York, USA)

5. University of Southern California Los Angeles (UCLA) (Los Angeles, California, USA)

6. California Institute of the Arts (Valencia, California, USA)

7. The Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (Prague, Czech Republic)

8. Columbia University School of the Arts (Manhattan, New York, USA)

9. Wesleyan University (Middleton, Connecticut, USA)

10. The National Film and Television School (Beaconsfield, United Kingdom)

11. La Femis (Paris, France)

12. University of North Carolina School of the Arts (Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA)

13. University of Texas at Austin (Austin, Texas, USA)

14. The Polish National Film, Television, and Theatre School (Lodz, Poland)

15. Syracuse University (Syracuse, New York, USA)

16. Stanford University (Palo Alto, California, USA)

17. Florida State University College of Motion Picture Arts (Tallahassee, Florida, USA)

18. Emerson Visual and Media Arts School (Boston, Massachusetts, USA)

19. Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles, California, USA)

20. University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA)

21. Rhode Island School of Design (Providence, Rhode Island, USA)

22. Chapman University, Dodge College of Film and Media Arts (Orange, California, USA)

23. Ringling College of Art and Design (Sarasota, Florida, USA)

24. Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois, USA)

25. Colorado Film School (Denver, Colorado, USA)

 

Call for papers on Contemporary Youth Cultures in Africa for special issue of African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society. Abstract deadline: 30 September 2011


Call for papers for special issue of African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society

Call for Papers (African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society): Late Modernity, Locality and Agency: Contemporary Youth Cultures in Africa

More than a decade and half ago, Donal Cruise-O’Brien (1996) had declared that the African youth were ‘a lost generation.’ This fatalistic summation of the fate of the African youth was perhaps for good reason. The enormous socio-economic and cultural forces surrounding the lives of young people in Africa were [and still are] simply daunting. And at the very core of this seemingly insurmountable socio-economic atmosphere are the pervasive unjust protocols of postcolonial regimes under which most African youth live. Indeed, more recent scholarship suggests that there is no respite yet for the African youth as the hopeless situation has escalated (See Abbink, Jon and Ineke Van Kessel 2005 & Alcinda Honwana and Filip De Boeck 2005). On account of the inclement socio-economic and political circumstances surrounding young people in Africa, what we are now witnessing across the entire continent is what Mamodou Douf (2003) describes as the ‘dramatic irruption of young people in both the domestic and public spheres,’ putting young people at the very heart of the continent’s socio-economic and political imagination (Durham 2006).

But the challenges facing African youth are not peculiar to them. All over the world, the new sociology of youth points to a growing concern about the ramifications of globalization, late modernity and general global social and economic restructuring for the lives and futures of young people. But amidst the lingering fears of the future of the young, scholars have also called for a deep reflection and rethinking of young people’s own resilience and agency in the midst of these turbulent times. This special issue of African Identities, tentatively entitled Late Modernity and Agency: Youth Cultures in Africa, seeks to reflect on the varied contours of youth responses to social change in Sub-Saharan Africa. While young people in Africa continue to face extraordinary social challenges in their everyday lives, what are the unique ways in which they have reinvented their circumstances to keep afloat in the midst of seismic global social changes? Papers are solicited on a wide range of topics on the African youth that may unravel young people not only as victims but also as active social actors in the face of a shifting global modernity. The themes may include amongst others:

– African Youth and Globalization
– Late Modernity and Social Change
– Youth and Media—Film, Television, Video, Internet, etc
– Hip-hop, Club Cultures and other forms of Popular culture
– Mobility and Social Media
– Gender and New Economies of Youth
– Democracy, Power and Youth Activism
– Youth and Conflict in Africa
– New Subjectivities and Agency
– Neo-Pentecostalism as Subculture
– The Informal Economy and Invented Pathways
– Lifestyles and Identity Constructions
– New Spatial Politics in Public and Domestic Spaces

Abstracts of not more than 500 words (including name, position, institutional affiliation, and email contact) may be sent to
P.UGor@bham.ac.uk no later than September 30th, 2011. This special issue of African Identities will be published in the summer of 2012.