Category Archives: Call for Papers

Call for Papers: Special Issue of Black Camera on Nollywood as a New Archive of Africa’s Worldliness, Deadline: 15 September 2012


CFP: Special Issue of Black Camera on Nollywood as a New Archive of Africa’s Worldliness

The cinema journal Black Camera invites submissions for a special
issue, or a section of a future issue, that will investigate
Nollywood, the Nigerian commercial movie industry, as a new archive of Africa’s worldliness. Inspired by the work of Achille Mbembe, this issue seeks to understand Nollywood as an everyday practice “through which Africans manage to recognize and maintain with the world an unprecedented familiarity” (Mbembe 2002). Nollywood’s significance, then, involves not only its staggering productivity and commercial success, but also encompasses its implicit challenge to dominant narratives that represent Africa as absolutely other or as defined by an essential difference.

We invite papers that put Nollywood in contact with current debates in film theory and world cinema studies, or that place Nollywood beside other transnational film and media industries so as to highlight its singularity and make visible a more variegated and complicated cultural ecology of globalization. We also welcome contributions that seek to understand Nollywood within the context of recent structural, technological, and ideological transformations associated with globalization and late capitalism and that explore Nollywood as shaped by its multiple circuits of consumption and production and by the global processes it participates in. We are interested in papers that attend to the aesthetics, stylistics, and imaginaries of Nollywood movies, with particular focus on the global popular and other discourses as reimagined and remixed by Nollywood.

Possible essay topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
Nollywood as a minor transnational practice; Nollywood and regional media flows in West Africa; affiliations between Nollywood and Hollywood, Bollywood or other commercial industries; Nollywood and the African diaspora; the transnational flow of Nollywood aesthetics; the New Nollywood; Nollywood and the “Worlding” of Africa; the Afropolis and Nollywood; video technology and Nollywood; Nollywood and transnational screening circuits; Nollywood co-productions;  Nollywood in South Africa; Nollywood in East Africa; cosmopolitan subjectivities and Nollywood; Nollywood and the governmentalities of neo-liberalism; the uneasy interaction of Nollywood and international film festivals.

In addition to essays, interviews and commentaries will be considered.

Essays should be 6,000-10,000 words, interviews 6,000 words, and commentaries 1,000-2,000 words.

Please submit completed essays, a 100-word abstract, a fifty-word
biography, and a CV by September 15th, 2012. Submissions should
conform to the most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.
Please see the Black Camera website for journal-specific guidelines:
http://www.indiana.edu/~blackcam/call/#guidelines

Direct all questions, correspondence, and submissions to guest editor Carmela Garritano (University of St. Thomas) at
cjgarritano@stthomas.edu.

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International Conference: Nollywood, Women, and Cultural Identity, at Benue State University, Makurdi, 8-11 May 2012


Nollywood, Women, and Cultural Identity

Call for papers: Everyday Media Culture in Africa. Conference at University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Abstract Deadline: 30 October 2011


Call for Papers: Beyond Normative Approaches: Everyday Media Culture in Africa

An international conference organized by the Department of Media Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan and with support from the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI), University of Westminster

Dates: 27-29 February 2012
Venue: University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Deadline for abstracts: 30 October 2011

We invite contributions that address the everyday lived experiences of Africans in their interaction with different kinds of media: old and new, state and private, elite and popular, global and national. All over the continent today, country by country, there are signs of growth and change-a buzz of energy stimulated, in part, by the rapid spread and impact of new mobile communication technologies and the new economic, political and social affordances which they help to create. The rise of these technologies, and the new forms of media practice and use associated with them, is in parallel with the emergence of new forms of commercial mediation and communications enterprises across the global South, which arguably complicate the role of the media in African cultures and societies.

Since media studies began in the 1970s, its object of study has changed in fundamental ways. Media were at first conceptualized almost wholly within the frame of the nation-state, its national politics and culture. The bulk of academic research on media and communication in Africa has studied media through the lens of media-state relations, hereby adopting liberal democracy as normative ideal and focusing on the potential contribution of African media to development and democratization. This approach has insufficiently looked at the actual role of media in African societies but instead focused on what roles media ought to play on the continent. Instead of understanding media on the continent on its own terms, scholars have often produced ahistorical accounts that posture as negative imprints of Western models of media-state relations. Furthermore, the heavy focus on media-state relations in studies on media in Africa has ignored both the way in which ordinary people relate to media and the increasingly important role of private capital and the market in the realm of African media.

Since the 1990s, the diffusion of continuing technological innovations in digital media and telecommunications, driven by the world economy, has changed the media landscape beyond recognition, producing the globalized world that all of us inhabit today. The question which then arises is what the study of media can tell us about Africa, in all its diversity, and the position of African societies in the world today. Among other issues, we invite participants to engage with one or more of the following questions:

Audiences, lived experience and changing notions of identity

– How can we research and theorize media cultures in today’s  Africa?

– What roles do different forms of media play in the everyday lives of Africans?

– How do global and national media contribute to changing notions of African identities?

Media, participation and resistance

– What role do old and new media play in forms of resistance on the continent?

– To what extent are media contributing to emerging participatory cultures in Africa?

– What does the diffusion and uptake of new media technologies tell us about social change taking place in Africa today?

Consumer culture and the media

– How can we understand the contribution of media to the rise of consumer cultures and consumption practices in Africa?

– What role do media and communications play in the increasing commodification of development?

– Who are the new entrepreneurial elites who are driving the diffusion of technological innovation in Africa?

For Africa-based scholars who would like to participate but require travel funding (primarily for airfare) to do so, please include a funding request with an estimated travel budget. A small amount of funding will be available to support presenters’ participation.

There will be a modest registration fee (R 175 for graduate students, R350 for faculty) to cover the costs of snacks and some meals.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should include the following: paper title, author, institutional affiliation and postal address, email address, abstract of no more than 300 words. Proposals should be sent on or before 30 October 2011 to Wendy Willems at: wendy.willems@wits.ac.za

Deadline for submission of abstract extended to 10 October for the Women in Northern Nigerian Literature and Film Conference at Kwara State University


Kwara State University has extended their call for abstracts deadline until 10 October 2011, for the Women in Literature and Film in Northern Nigeria Conference, that is to be held 29 November to 2 December 2011. This from the conference organizers.

The abstract deadline has been extended. One page abstracts are invited from interested participants on any aspect of the conference theme and sub-themes, to reach the organizers immediately but not later than October 10th, 2011, the extended submission deadline.

For more details on the conference theme, call for papers, and location, see the original post about the conference.

Call for Papers: “Nollywood and the Global South” a Special Issue of The Global South, Deadline for abstracts 4 November 2011


CFP: The Global South 6.2 (Fall 2012)
Nollywood and the Global South

The Global South is an interdisciplinary journal, published semiannually by Indiana University Press. The journal focuses on how world literatures and cultures respond to globalization. Its premise is that the various Souths苯rom the North American South to the European South, Latin and Central America, Africa, Asia, and Australia貞hare comparable experiences that differentiate them from mainstream and hegemonic cultures in their locations. Since many of these Souths share not necessarily a common wealth, but various issues of marginalization and inadequate access to means of production and amenities under globalization, TGS is concerned with the intersections among their experiences. The journal is interested in how authors, writers, and critics respond to issues of the environment; poverty; immigration; gender; race; hybridity; cultural formation and transformation; colonialism and postcolonialism; modernity and postmodernity; transatlantic encounters, homes, and diasporas; resistance and counter discourse; among others under the superordinate umbrella of globalization. This Call for Papers is for a special issue on Nollywood and the Global South.

Nollywood, the Nigerian film industry, is one of the fastest growing movie industries in the world. In terms of creativity and inventiveness, Nollywood movies provide a good example of Africans consuming what they produce. The responses of people of African descent in the Diaspora and in the Global South as well as those of people all over the world to the phenomenon of Nollywood raise critical social, economic, literary, and cultural questions about globalization and interculturalism. In this issue of The Global South, we invite essays from scholars working in all areas of African and film studies on all aspects of Nollywood, globalization, and the global south, including essays on the history and emergence of Nollywood, how Nollywood acts as an agent of globalization and how it contests globalization by promoting local discourses, how Nollywood functions as an alternative means of cultural representation, counter-discourse, and cultural renaissance, as well as articles on theory and aesthetics. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

History of Nollywood
The Future of Nollywood
Reality in/and Nollywood
Karma and Nollywood
African Morality and Nollywood
Nollywood and Auto/biography
Nollywood and Cultural Renaissance
Nollywood and Tradition
Nollywood and Religion
Nollywood and Race
Nollywood and Gender
Nollywood and Class
Nollywood and Ethnicity
Nollywood and Globalization
Nollywood and the Nigerian Music Industry
Nollywood and Aesthetics
Nollywood and Nigerian Politics
Nollywood and the African Diaspora
Nollywood, Hollywood, and Bollywood
Nollywood and Language
Nollywood and Orality
Nollywood and Madness
Nollywood and Cultural Conflict
Nollywood and Marriage
Nollywood and Crime
Nollywood and Reflections on Africa

This special issue of The Global South (co-edited by Adetayo Alabi, Ifeanyi Ezeonu, and Kolawole Olaiya) is scheduled for publication in Fall 2012. Please submit abstracts and a short bio by November 4, 2011, final drafts of essays by March 4, 2011, and inquiries to Adetayo Alabi, aalabi@olemiss.edu. Essays should be 25-35 double-spaced pages long and should follow the MLA style.

You can read more about The Global South at http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublication?journalCode=globalsouth

Call for papers for an International Conference on the Theorization and Classification of African Regional Movies. Abstract Deadline: 20 September 2011


From the Society of Movie Scholars:

African movies across its regions have grown to the extent that there is need to critically do their in-depth studies with the purpose of generating theories on their packaging, analysis and proper classification into genres. Most movies produced in Africa are packaged without recourse to definite theories. Broadly speaking, most of the movies can be categorized into three groups namely, cultural or epic; modern and religious movies. While the religious and cultural movies could be in local or foreign languages, modern movies are so described because they are often located in the context of urban or rural populace and are produced in foreign or local languages, treating themes bothering on modern issues. But where they are in local languages, they are often lazed with Pidgin English or code mixed. However, these groupings possess the tendency to overlap if these categories are to be retained. Thus, it is difficult to arrogate to these groupings as genres on their own, more so that these grading are not guided by definite theories.

To define these groups effectively therefore, it might be necessary to do a close survey of their constituents. This is when the components can be highlighted into specific genres for stimulating and rich academic exercise. It is expected as the outcome of the exercise that specialization, originality and scope-widening and thus further ground for employment creation and legitimacy of production and its development would be engendered. Then practitioners’ specializations on specific genres would increase, and the tendency to recycle old ideas for new creations would be reduced.
This conference is therefore organized with the intent of gathering interested scholars and practitioners within and outside Africa to rub minds so as to evolve specific theories of packaging, analysis, and map out what genres African movies could be grouped. Taking a leap from the fact that movies are audio-visualisation of literature and literary texts and are analysed based on definite theories, the objective therefore is to cut a niche for African movies like literature, and place them strategically in the world movie categorizations but based on African development ideals and thus globalise what hitherto were local mediations.

In view of the above, abstracts are invited from academics, media industry professionals, movie producers, distributors, government agencies, policymakers, movie regulators, agencies, donors, civil society organisations, independent consultants, research groups and students, on any aspects of the under listed sub-themes. Such abstracts which should not exceed 200 words should be based on the analysis of select movies that fall within the sub-themes. This would eventually argue out the basis for specified theories and why the movie should be classified within the genres that the scholar is advocating. Contributors should however not forget to state under which sub-theme they are submitting their abstract.
Abstracts are to be sent to our email address: moviescholars@gmail.com on or before September 20th 2011, while full paper must reach us before September 30th, 2011.

Sub-themes
Below are the likely, but by no means the only sub-themes on which abstracts can be submitted.
Trends in movie Theories.
Existing Literary Theories and the need or not, for distinct African movie theories.
Generating theories on African movies.
Emergent genres in African movies.
Movies and the relevance of African-specific genres.
Classifying African urban and rural movies.
Gender and social issues in African movies, need for classical genrization.
War and crime movies and proper classification.
Travel movies and issues of depiction.
African movies and the global media culture.
Representation of economic and political issues in African movies
Africans’ contributions to the Theories of Gaze.
Sociology and Psychology of African movies.
Conference Dates: October 27-29, 2011
Venue: Osun State University, Osogbo; Nigeria.
Proposals should include abstract title, author’s name, address, telephone number, email address, and institutional affiliation.
Conference fee: A non-refundable registration fee of N15, 000 or (USD 250, BP150 for participants from the US, Europe, and other African countries). This must be paid immediately when an abstract is accepted. It is expected that all participants will raise the funding to attend the conference please.
Enquiries:
For more details, please contact any of the following:
*Kayode Animasaun, PhD: College of Humanities and Culture Osun State University, Ikire Campus, Ikire. Convener and Chairman LOC:
+2348073787551, drkayanimasaun@gmail.Com
*Gloria Ernest-Samuel, Imo State University Owerri- Sec. LOC
+2348035085625, gloimsu@yahoo.com
*Ameh Akoh PhD H.O.D Languages and Linguistics Department, Osun State University, Ikire Campus, Ikire
: +2348035992490, amehakoh@yahoo.co.uk

For more details, please visit the website:
http://www.moviescholars.org

 

Call for Papers: African Music in the 21st Century–an Iconic Turn?–Mainz, Germany, Abstract Deadline: 15 September 2011


Call for Papers
African Music in the 21st Century – An Iconic Turn?
An International Symposium Celebrating the 21st Anniversary of the African Music Archives Mainz (AMA)

To be held at: Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany. June 13th – 16th 2012
Convenors: Hauke Dorsch, Matthias Krings

Since the advent of the 21st century and the proliferation of digital media a shift in the consumption and marketing of music in a number of African countries occurred: Videos gained an increasing importance. Today, Video-CDs and DVDs are widely sold in African cities, bars and restaurants show music clips and music casting shows on TV, music videos are available online through sites like youtube, but also via homepages and blogs devoted to artists, genres, and (at least ideally) music of the entire continent.

Due to this online availability and easy circulation of discs the visual aspects of music, especially dance styles, clothing fashions, coiffure spread more easily and rapidly than ever before between
different African countries and between African and its Diaspora. For example, migrants stay up to date with regards to musical and fashion trends in their respective countries of origin thanks to these videos. Prior to the mediatisation of African music through visual technologies, dance styles could only be transmitted through the presence of human bodies. Due to the proliferation of videos African dance and music travel trans-nationally on South-South and South-North axes at an accelerated speed.

So far, the pictorial turn (Mitchell) or iconic turn (Boehm) in Cultural Studies informed only few studies on African music. Consequently, the change following the digitisation and video-isation of the production and dissemination of African music is still under-researched. Taking music videos as its vantage point, this symposium will look at visual aspects of the performance and analysis of music more generally.

We invite young researchers and established scholars to present papers on the different ways music in Africa (and beyond) is interpreted, illustrated, translated or extended in its meaning by visual representations. These may refer to the analysis of individual videos, the comparison of a number of videos, or genres, changing trends of video aesthetics, the convergence of visual and aesthetic trends from elsewhere – in Africa and beyond (i.e. MTV, Bollywood, etc.). Furthermore, papers on the transformation (or even emergence) of music industries in Africa due to the impact of the visual are welcome. How are music videos produced on the ground? Who are the agents of the iconic turn in African music? How does music television support the iconic turn in African music? Finally, we invite papers on other aspects of the visual in music, performance (i.e. looking at costumes, stage shows,
stage lighting, etc.), on festivals and of course dance.

The symposium will celebrate the African Music Archives’ 21st anniversary. The AMA hosts Germany’s largest collection of recordings of African popular music. It includes roughly 10.000 recordings, from shellac records of the 1950s, to vinyl discs and singles from the 1960s to the 1990s, to music cassettes of the 1980s and 90s, to recent CDs, VideoCDs and DVDs.

The symposium will be hosted by the African Music Archives, Department of Anthropology and African Studies, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

Please submit your proposal no later than Sept., 15th 2011 and your full paper no later than May, 23rd 2012 to Hauke Dorsch dorschh@uni-mainz.de.