Tag Archives: conferences

Call for Papers: African Music in the 21st Century–an Iconic Turn?–Mainz, Germany, Abstract Deadline: 15 September 2011


Call for Papers
African Music in the 21st Century – An Iconic Turn?
An International Symposium Celebrating the 21st Anniversary of the African Music Archives Mainz (AMA)

To be held at: Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany. June 13th – 16th 2012
Convenors: Hauke Dorsch, Matthias Krings

Since the advent of the 21st century and the proliferation of digital media a shift in the consumption and marketing of music in a number of African countries occurred: Videos gained an increasing importance. Today, Video-CDs and DVDs are widely sold in African cities, bars and restaurants show music clips and music casting shows on TV, music videos are available online through sites like youtube, but also via homepages and blogs devoted to artists, genres, and (at least ideally) music of the entire continent.

Due to this online availability and easy circulation of discs the visual aspects of music, especially dance styles, clothing fashions, coiffure spread more easily and rapidly than ever before between
different African countries and between African and its Diaspora. For example, migrants stay up to date with regards to musical and fashion trends in their respective countries of origin thanks to these videos. Prior to the mediatisation of African music through visual technologies, dance styles could only be transmitted through the presence of human bodies. Due to the proliferation of videos African dance and music travel trans-nationally on South-South and South-North axes at an accelerated speed.

So far, the pictorial turn (Mitchell) or iconic turn (Boehm) in Cultural Studies informed only few studies on African music. Consequently, the change following the digitisation and video-isation of the production and dissemination of African music is still under-researched. Taking music videos as its vantage point, this symposium will look at visual aspects of the performance and analysis of music more generally.

We invite young researchers and established scholars to present papers on the different ways music in Africa (and beyond) is interpreted, illustrated, translated or extended in its meaning by visual representations. These may refer to the analysis of individual videos, the comparison of a number of videos, or genres, changing trends of video aesthetics, the convergence of visual and aesthetic trends from elsewhere – in Africa and beyond (i.e. MTV, Bollywood, etc.). Furthermore, papers on the transformation (or even emergence) of music industries in Africa due to the impact of the visual are welcome. How are music videos produced on the ground? Who are the agents of the iconic turn in African music? How does music television support the iconic turn in African music? Finally, we invite papers on other aspects of the visual in music, performance (i.e. looking at costumes, stage shows,
stage lighting, etc.), on festivals and of course dance.

The symposium will celebrate the African Music Archives’ 21st anniversary. The AMA hosts Germany’s largest collection of recordings of African popular music. It includes roughly 10.000 recordings, from shellac records of the 1950s, to vinyl discs and singles from the 1960s to the 1990s, to music cassettes of the 1980s and 90s, to recent CDs, VideoCDs and DVDs.

The symposium will be hosted by the African Music Archives, Department of Anthropology and African Studies, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

Please submit your proposal no later than Sept., 15th 2011 and your full paper no later than May, 23rd 2012 to Hauke Dorsch dorschh@uni-mainz.de.

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Call for papers: 2nd Global Conference on Urban Popcultures, Prague, Czech Republic, Deadline for abstracts: 30 September 2011


Call for papers copied below:

Call for Papers

2nd Global Conference

uplogo

Friday 9th March – Sunday 11th March 2012
Prague, Czech Republic


upcfpThis inter- and multi-disciplinary conference aims to examine, explore and critically engage with issues related to urban life. The project will promote the ongoing analysis of the varied creative trends and alternative cultural movements that comprise urban popultures and subcultures. In particular the conference will encourage equally theoretical and practical debates which surround the cultural and political contexts within which alternative urban subcultures are flourishing.

Papers, reports, work-in-progress, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues related to any of the following themes:

1. Popular, Alternative, and Underground Music Cultures
Alternative and Underground Dance, Electronica, Hip Hop, Gothic, Punk and Post-Rock Scenes. Local, Regional, and Global Scenes. The Mass-Appropriation of Underground Music. Independent Music Cultures. Popular Music Theory.

2. Subcultures, Communities, and Codes
Underground and Alternative Ideologies and Lifestyles. Issues of Gender, Sexuality, and Identity. The Avantgarde and Urban Codes. Urban Religion and Religious Expressions. D.I.Y.

3. Theories and Critical Studies of Popular Culture
Histories, Representations, and Discourses on Independent Scenes. The Frankfurt School. The Visual Turn. Urban Intertextualities and Intermedialities. Cultural Appropriations. Postmodernity and Beyond.

4. Popular and Subversive Expressions in Fashion, Art, Film, and Literature
Urban and Contemporary Life and Themes Considered in Music, Literature, Art and Film. Urban Fashion, Style, and Branding. Pop Art. Graffiti. Low vs. High Culture.

5. The City as Creative Subject/Object
Virtual Urbanity – Online Communities and the Impact of Social Networking. Urban Identity and Membership. Globalization/Localization of Urban Experience. Recent trends in Copyright/Copyleft. The Role of Internet in the Transformation of Music Industry. The Impact of User-generated Content.

6. Conflict, Popular Revolt, and Politics
Music and Politics. Race and Music Styles. Music Revolutions. Generational Conflicts. Class Divisions. Ageing Music Fans and Cross-generational Cool. New Schools vs. Old Schools.

7. Popular Culture Online and in Massmedia
The Visual Aspects of Urban Entertainment. The Evolution of Music and Thematic Television. Media Structure of Music Video. Explicit TV and Censorship.

300 word abstracts should be   submitted by Friday 30th September 2011. All submissions are minimally   double blind peer reviewed where appropriate. If an abstract is accepted   for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday27th January 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to the   Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats   with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12)   and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters   or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge  receipt  and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not  receive a  reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive  your  proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to  look for  an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs
Jordan Copeland
La Salle University,
Philadelphia, USA

Daniel Riha
Hub Leader (Cyber), Inter-Disciplinary.Net
Charles University,
Prague, Czech Republic

Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Network Leader
Inter-Disciplinary.Net,
Freeland, Oxfordshire, UK

The conference is part of the ‘Critical Issues’ programme of research projects. It aims to bring together   people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore   various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be  eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited  for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s) or for  inclusion in a new Cyber journal (launching 2011).

For more information about the conference or submission, see the original call for papers here.  For more on the ongoing Urban Popcultures research project, see the website here.

Call for papers on Contemporary Youth Cultures in Africa for special issue of African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society. Abstract deadline: 30 September 2011


Call for papers for special issue of African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society

Call for Papers (African Identities: Journal of Economics, Culture and Society): Late Modernity, Locality and Agency: Contemporary Youth Cultures in Africa

More than a decade and half ago, Donal Cruise-O’Brien (1996) had declared that the African youth were ‘a lost generation.’ This fatalistic summation of the fate of the African youth was perhaps for good reason. The enormous socio-economic and cultural forces surrounding the lives of young people in Africa were [and still are] simply daunting. And at the very core of this seemingly insurmountable socio-economic atmosphere are the pervasive unjust protocols of postcolonial regimes under which most African youth live. Indeed, more recent scholarship suggests that there is no respite yet for the African youth as the hopeless situation has escalated (See Abbink, Jon and Ineke Van Kessel 2005 & Alcinda Honwana and Filip De Boeck 2005). On account of the inclement socio-economic and political circumstances surrounding young people in Africa, what we are now witnessing across the entire continent is what Mamodou Douf (2003) describes as the ‘dramatic irruption of young people in both the domestic and public spheres,’ putting young people at the very heart of the continent’s socio-economic and political imagination (Durham 2006).

But the challenges facing African youth are not peculiar to them. All over the world, the new sociology of youth points to a growing concern about the ramifications of globalization, late modernity and general global social and economic restructuring for the lives and futures of young people. But amidst the lingering fears of the future of the young, scholars have also called for a deep reflection and rethinking of young people’s own resilience and agency in the midst of these turbulent times. This special issue of African Identities, tentatively entitled Late Modernity and Agency: Youth Cultures in Africa, seeks to reflect on the varied contours of youth responses to social change in Sub-Saharan Africa. While young people in Africa continue to face extraordinary social challenges in their everyday lives, what are the unique ways in which they have reinvented their circumstances to keep afloat in the midst of seismic global social changes? Papers are solicited on a wide range of topics on the African youth that may unravel young people not only as victims but also as active social actors in the face of a shifting global modernity. The themes may include amongst others:

– African Youth and Globalization
– Late Modernity and Social Change
– Youth and Media—Film, Television, Video, Internet, etc
– Hip-hop, Club Cultures and other forms of Popular culture
– Mobility and Social Media
– Gender and New Economies of Youth
– Democracy, Power and Youth Activism
– Youth and Conflict in Africa
– New Subjectivities and Agency
– Neo-Pentecostalism as Subculture
– The Informal Economy and Invented Pathways
– Lifestyles and Identity Constructions
– New Spatial Politics in Public and Domestic Spaces

Abstracts of not more than 500 words (including name, position, institutional affiliation, and email contact) may be sent to
P.UGor@bham.ac.uk no later than September 30th, 2011. This special issue of African Identities will be published in the summer of 2012.

Women and Film in Africa Conference: Overcoming Social Barriers (London): Abstract Deadline 16 September 2011


 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Women and Film in Africa Conference: Overcoming Social Barriers

Conference organised by the
Africa Media Centre, University of Westminster

Date: Saturday 19 and Sunday 20 November 2011
Venue: University of Westminster, Marylebone Campus
35 Marylebone Road, London, NW1 5LS

This is a 1st Call for Papers for a conference on the contemporary and historical role played by women in the film, television and video industries in Africa. From the Arab North Africa, West Africa, Central and East Africa, through to Southern Africa, women have emerged from the double oppression of patriarchy and colonialism to become the unsung heroines of the moving image as producers, directors, actresses, script writers, financiers, promoters, marketers and distributors of film, television and video in postcolonial Africa. Sadly, such immense contributions by women are underrepresented, both in industry debates and in academic research. There are now many cases in which African women in front of and behind the camera have overcome social barriers and yet this is sidelined. This conference invites students, practitioners, academics and researchers to debate how women have contributed to film, television and video markets in Africa from pre-colonial, colonial to postcolonial periods. Existing industry and academic work should also discuss the ways female audiences in Africa have engaged with film, television and video texts. The conference will include a session with leading female filmmakers. Papers may include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following themes:

 

  • The Influence of Feminism on African filmmakers
  • Women in front and behind the camera in African film
  • Women in the African feature film industry
  • Women in technical roles in film, video and television in Africa
  • Women documentary makers in Africa
  • Gender and Representation of Women in African film
  • Audiences for films by African women/Female audiences in Africa
  • Case histories of leading African women film makers
  • Women scriptwriters
  • African women acting in video, film and television
  • Censorship and the portrayal of African women in film and television
  • The role of NGOs in commissioning women filmmakers and issue-based films
  • How African governments have helped or hindered filmmaking by African women


DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS

The deadline for submission of abstracts is Friday 16 September, 2011. Successful applicants will be notified by Friday 23 September, 2011. Abstracts should be 200 words long. They must include the title of the conference, presenter’s name, affiliation, email and postal address, together with the title of the paper. Please ensure when saving your abstract that your name is part of the file name. Please email your abstract to Helen Cohen, Events Administrator at: (journalism@westminster.ac.uk
 <mailto:journalism@westminster.ac.uk).

PROGRAMME AND REGISTRATION

This two day conference will take place on Saturday 19 and Sunday 20 November, 2011. The fee for registration (which applies to all participants, including presenters) will be £135, with a concessionary rate of £55 for students, to cover all conference documentation, refreshments and administration costs. Registration will open in September 2011